Category Archives: Biography

That Others May Live: The True Story of a P. J. , A Member of America’s Most Daring Rescue Force

They are the military’s most elite force, a highly trained group of men serving the Air Force and National Guard with a mandate to fly behind enemy lines during war and rescue downed pilots. They are pararescue jumpers, or PJs for short, the most radically fit, mentally tough men in the armed forces. During peacetime, PJs keep their skills sharp with daring civilian rescues, recovering victims from scorching deserts, treacherous mountaintops, or raging seas. Most people learned of the PJs in The Perfect Storm, with its riveting account of how a helicopter of PJs from a squadron on Long Island plunged into the Atlantic during a rescue.

Senior Master Sergeant Jack Brehm was the PJ supervisor that night and coordinated the dramatic rescue efforts. Life-and-death situations are all in a day’s work for the PJs, who are always on call, ready to put their own lives on the line so “that others may live.” In an age seemingly devoid of heroes, these men are the real deal, a close-knit unit bound together by bravery and guts, selflessness and sacrifice, and the intense desire to both serve their country and live life on the edge.

That Others May Live is the thrilling story of Jack Brehm and his love affair with two things: the PJ way of life, and his wife, Peggy, the mother of his five children. In 1977, twenty-year-old Jack, an aimless kid from Long Island, made a decision that would alter the course of his life—he decided to become a PJ. He entered “Superman School,” the indoctrination program where PJs are made. It is the toughest program in the military, moredifficult than what the Navy SEALs or Army Special Ops go through. No one flunks out—it just gets harder and harder until most guys eliminate themselves. In other programs candidates might say, “They can beat me, but they can’t kill me.” In Superman School, the candidates say, “They can kill me, but they can’t eat me.”

Jack Brehm was transformed from a kid without a clue into a man with a purpose. He and nine other men graduated in the class of ’78-03—they had the right stuff. More than eighty others in their class didn’t. That Others May Live is a vivid, compelling account of Jack’s twenty years as a PJ. We see him and his fellow PJs climb mountains and battle storms to save lives, struggle with their emotions as PJ friends die, wait anxiously to hear if they are called to war in a place such as Kosovo or the Persian Gulf, and try to keep their families together despite the enormous pressure of the job. Jack is luckier than most PJs, for he has Peggy and his five kids. In the end, it becomes clear who the real hero is in Jack’s life: his rock-solid wife. Jack may wear the parachute, but Peggy wears the pants.

By: Jack Brehm and Pete Nelson

Published: 2000, Crown Publishers

Hardcover, 287 pages

Rehnquist

The impact of Chief Justice William Rehnquist — who served as a Supreme Court justice for a third of a century and headed the federal judiciary under four presidents — cannot be overstated. His dissenting opinion in Roe v. Wade, and his strongly stated positions on issues as various as freedom of the press, school prayer, and civil rights, would guarantee his memory on their own. Chiefly, though, William Rehnquist will always be remembered for his highly visible role in two of the most important and contentious political events of recent American history: the impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton in 1999 and the Supreme Court’s decision that made George W. Bush the victor in the presidential election of 2000.

Despite his importance as a public figure, however, William Rehnquist scrupulously preserved his private life. And while his judicial opinions often inflamed passions and aroused both ire and praise, they were rarely personal. The underlying quirks, foibles, and eccentricities of the man were always under wraps.

Now, however, journalist Herman J. Obermayer has broken that silence in a memoir of their nineteen-year friendship that is both factually detailed and intensely moving, his own personal tribute to his dearest friend. In these pages, we meet for the first time William Rehnquist the man, in a portrait that can only serve to enhance the legacy of a Chief Justice who will be remembered in history as being among America’s most influential.

Author: Herman J. Obermayer

Published: 2009 New York. Threshold Editions

249 Pages

Subjects: Rehnquist, William H., 1924-2005. United States. Supreme Court. Judges –United States –Biography. Political questions and judicial power –United States.

The Roots of Obama’s Rage

YOU WILL NEVER SEE OBAMA THE SAME WAY AGAIN

He’s been called many things: a socialist, a radical fellow traveler, a Chicago machine politician, a prince of the civil rights movement, a virtual second coming of Christ, or even a covert Muslim.

But as New York Times bestselling author Dinesh D’Souza points out in this shockingly revealing book, these labels merely slap our own preconceived notions on Barack Obama.

The real Obama is a man shaped by experiences far different from those of most Americans; he is a much stranger, more determined, and exponentially more dangerous man than you’d ever imagined. He is not motivated by the civil rights struggles of African Americans in the 1960s—those battles leave him wholly untouched. He is not motivated by the socialist or Marxist propaganda that hypnotized a whole generation of wooly–minded academics and condescending liberals—those concepts also leave him cold.

What really motivates Barack Obama is an inherited rage—an often masked, but profound rage that comes from his African father; an anticolonialist rage against Western dominance, and most especially against the wealth and power of the very nation Barack Obama now leads. It is this rage that explains the previously inexplicable, and that gives us a startling look at what might lie ahead.

In The Roots of Obama’s Rage you’ll learn: Why Obama’s economic policies are actually designed to make America poorer compared to the rest of the world Why Obama will welcome a nuclear Iran Why Obama sees America as a rogue nation—worse than North Korea The real reason Obama banished a bust of Winston Churchill from the White House and ordered NASA to praise the scientific contributions of Muslims Why Obama would like to make America’s superpower status a thing of the past

Stunning, provocative, original, and telling—no one has better diagnosed who Obama is, what he intends to do, and why he poses an existential threat to America than Dinesh D’Souza in The Roots of Obama’s Rage.

Author: Dinesh D’Souza

Published: 2010  Washington DC, Regnery Publishing

220 Pages

Subjects: Obama, Barack. Presidents –United States –Biography.