Presidential Unit Citation

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Presidential Unit Citation
Army and Air Force Presidential Unit Citation
Army and Air Force Presidential Unit Citation
Navy and Marine Corps Presidential Unit Citation
Navy and Marine Corps Presidential Unit Citation
Coast Guard Presidential Unit Citation
Coast Guard Presidential Unit Citation
Awarded by United States Military
Type Ribbon and streamer
Eligibility Military units
Awarded for "[G]allantry, determination, and esprit de corps in accomplishing its mission under extremely difficult and hazardous conditions."[1]
Status Currently awarded
Statistics
First awarded 1941
Last awarded Ongoing
Precedence
Next (higher) Navy and Marine Corps – Combat Action Ribbon
Air Force – Air Force Combat Action Medal
Coast Guard – Coast Guard Combat Action Ribbon
Individual
equivalent
Distinguished Service Cross, Navy Cross, Air Force Cross
Next (lower) Joint Meritorious Unit Award
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180px
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Streamers for the Presidential Unit Citation (top: USA and USAF PUC Streamer; middle: the Navy and Marine Corps PUC Streamer; bottom: the Coast Guard PUC Streamer)

The Presidential Unit Citation, originally called the Distinguished Unit Citation, is awarded to U.S. Armed Forces units and their allies for extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy on or after 7 December 1941. The unit must display such gallantry, determination, and esprit de corps in accomplishing its mission under extremely difficult and hazardous conditions so as to set it apart from and above other units participating in the same campaign.

Since its inception by Executive Order on 26 February 1942, retroactive to 7 December 1941, to 2008, the Presidential Unit Citation has been awarded in such conflicts as World War II, Korean War, Vietnam War, Iraq War, and the War in Afghanistan.

The degree of heroism required is the same as that which would warrant award of the Distinguished Service Cross, Air Force Cross or Navy Cross to an individual. In some cases, one or more individuals within the unit may have also been awarded personal recognitions for their contribution to the actions for which their entire unit was awarded a Presidential Unit Citation.

Contents

Creation and Official Format

Army and Air Force

The Army citation was established as the Distinguished Unit Citation by Executive Order No. 9075 on 26 February 1942, and received its present name on 3 November 1966. As with other Army unit citations, the PUC is in a larger frame that is worn above the right pocket. All members of the unit may wear the decoration, whether or not they personally participated in the acts for which the unit was cited. Only those assigned to the unit at the time of the action cited may wear the decoration as a permanent award. For the Army and Air Force, the emblem itself is a solid blue ribbon enclosed in a gold frame.

The Air Force PUC was adopted from the Army Distinguished Unit Citation, after they were made into a separate military branch in 1947. They also renamed the unit citation to its present name on 3 November 1966. The Air Force wears its unit citation on the left pocket below all personal awards, unlike the Army not every unit award is enclosed in a gold frame.

The Citation is carried on the unit's regimental colours in the form of a blue streamer, Template:Convert/ftTemplate:Convert/test/Aon long and Template:Convert/inTemplate:Convert/test/Aon wide. For the Army, only on rare occasions will a unit larger than battalion qualify for award of this decoration.[2]

Navy and Marine Corps

File:US-Navy-PUC-Pennant.JPG
Presidential Unit Citation pennant and ribbon.

The Navy citation is the unit equivalent of a Navy Cross and was established by Executive Order No. 9050 on 6 February 1942.

The Navy version has blue, yellow, and red horizontal stripes. To distinguish between the two versions of the Presidential Unit Citation, the Navy version is typically referred to as the Navy and Marine Corps Presidential Unit Citation while the Army and Air Force refer to the decoration simply as the Presidential Unit Citation. These are only worn by persons who meet the criteria at the time it is awarded to the unit. Unlike the Army, those who later join the unit do not wear it on a temporary basis.

Special Clasps

USS Nautilus (SSN-571)

To commemorate the first submerged voyage under the North Pole by the nuclear-powered submarine USS Nautilus (SSN-571) in 1958, all members of her crew who made that voyage were authorized to wear their Presidential Unit Citation ribbon with a special clasp in the form of a gold block letter N.[3]

USS Triton (SSRN-586)

To commemorate the first submerged circumnavigation of the world by the nuclear-powered submarine Triton during its shakedown cruise in 1960, all members of her crew who made that voyage were authorized to wear their Presidential Unit Citation ribbon with a special clasp in the form of a golden replica of the globe.[4]

Coast Guard

United States Coast Guard units may be awarded either the Navy or Coast Guard version of the Presidential Unit Citation, depending on which service the Coast Guard was supporting when the citation action was performed.

Special Clasp

A Coast Guard version of the award was awarded to all U.S. Coast Guard and Coast Guard Auxiliary responding to Hurricane Katrina by President George W. Bush for rescue and relief operations. All Coast Guard members who received the award are authorized to wear the Presidential Unit Citation ribbon with a special clasp in the form of the internationally recognized “hurricane symbol”.

Recipients

World War II

Army

Unit Service Year awarded Campaign or battle Notes
26th Cavalry Regiment U.S. Army 1941 Battle of Damortis/Lingayen Gulf
Division and 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division U.S. Army 1944 Normandy
Division and 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (less 2nd Battalion, 401st Glider Infantry Regiment) and with the following attached unit: 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment. U.S. Army 1945 Battle of Bastogne CITADEL OF BASTOGNE

As authorized by Executive Order 9396 (sec. I, Bul. 22,WD, 1943), superseding Executive Order 9075 (sec. III, WD Bul, 11, 1942), the following unit is cited by the War Department under the provisions of section IV, Circular No. 333, War Department, 1943 in the name of the President of the United States as public evidence of deserved honor and distinction.

The citation reads as follows: 101st Airborne Division (less 2nd Battalion, 401st Glider Infantry Regiment), with the following-attached units: 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment; 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment; 463rd Parachute Field Artillery Battalion; Counterintelligence Detachment, 101st Airborne Division; Order of Battle Detachment Number 5; Military Intelligence Interpreter Team Number 410; Photo Interpreter Teams Number 9 & 81; Prisoner of War Interrogation Teams Number 1, 9 & 87; Third Auxiliary Surgical Group, Team Number 3; 969th Field Artillery Battalion; 755th Field Artillery Battalion; 705th Field Artillery Battalion; Combat Command B, 10th Armored Division including: Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Combat Command B, 10th Armored Division; 3rd Tank Battalion (less Company C); 20th Armored Infantry Battalion (less Company A); 54th Armored Infantry Battalion (less Company A and C); 420th Armored Field Artillery Battalion; Troop D, 90th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron (Mechanized); Company C, 609th Tank Destroyer Battalion (less 1st Platoon; with 2nd Platoon Reconnaissance Company attached); Battery B, 796th Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion; Company C, 55th Armored Engineer Battalion ; Company C, 21st Tank Battalion; Reserve Command, 9th Armored Division including: Headquarters Reserve Command, 9th Armored Division; Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 12th Armored Group; 2nd Tank Battalion; 52nd Armored Infantry Battalion; 73rd Armored Field Artillery Battalion; Company C, 9th Armored Engineer Battalion; Company C, 811th Tank Destroyer Battalion; Battery C, 482nd Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion (Self-Propelled); These units distinguished themselves in combat against powerful and aggressive enemy forces composed of elements of 8 German divisions during the period from 18 December to 27 December 1944 by extraordinary heroism and gallantry in defense of the key communications center of Bastogne, Belgium.

Essential to a large scale exploitation of his break-through into Belgium and northern Luxembourg, the enemy attempted to seize Bastogne by attacking constantly and savagely with the best of his armor and infantry.

Without benefit of prepared defenses, facing almost overwhelming odds and with very limited and fast dwindling supplies, these units maintained a high combat morale and an impenetrable defense, despite extremely heavy bombing, intense artillery fire, and constant attacks from infantry and armor on all sides of their completely cut off and encircled position. This masterful and grimly determined defense denied the enemy even momentary success in an operation for which he paid dearly in men, material, and eventually morale.

The outstanding courage and resourcefulness and undaunted determination of this gallant force is in keeping with the highest traditions of the service.

[General Orders No. 17, War Department, 13 March 1945.]

117th Regiment, Easy Company U.S. Army 1944 Battle of Aachen
3rd Infantry Division U.S. Army 1945 COLMAR War Department General Orders Number 44, 6 June 1945: As authorized by Executive Order 9396 (sec. I, WD Bul. 22, 1943), superseding Executive Order 9075 (sec. III, WD Bul, 11, 1942), the following unit is cited by the War Department for outstanding performance of duty in action during the period indicated under provisions of section IV, WD Circular 333, 1943, In the name of the President of the United States as public evidence of deserved honor and distinction. The citation reads as follows:

The 3rd Infantry Division with the following-attached units: 254 Infantry Regiment, 99th Chemical Battalion, 168th Chemical Smoke Generator Company, 441st Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion, 601st Tank Destroyer Battalion (SP), 756th Tank Battalion, IPW Team 183, fighting incessantly, from 22 January-6 February 1945, in heavy snow storms, through enemy-infested marshes and woods, and over a flat plain crisscrossed by numerous small canals, irrigation ditches, and unfordable streams, terrain ideally suited to the defense, breached the German defense wall on the northern perimeter of the Colmar bridgehead and drove forward to isolate Colmar from the Rhine. Crossing the Fecht River from Guemar, Alsace, by stealth during the late hours of darkness of 22 January, the assault elements fought their way forward against mounting resistance. Reaching the Ill River, a bridge was thrown across but collapsed before armor could pass to the support of two battalions of the 80th Infantry on the far side. Isolated and attacked by a full German Panzer brigade, outnumbered and outgunned, these valiant troops were forced back yard by yard. Wave after wave of armor and infantry was hurled against them but despite hopeless odds the regiment held tenaciously to its bridgehead. Driving forward in knee-deep snow, which masked acres of densely sown mines, the 3d Infantry Division fought from house to house and street to street in the fortress towns of the Alsatian Plain. Under furious concentrations of supporting fire, assault troops crossed the Colmar Canal in rubber boats during the night of 29 January. Driving relentlessly forward, six towns were captured within eight hours, 500 casualties inflicted on the enemy during the day, and large quantities of booty seized. Slashing through to the Rhone-Rhine Canal, the garrison at Colmar was cut off and the fall of the city assured. Shifting the direction of attack, the division moved south between the Rhone-Rhine Canal and the Rhine toward Neuf Brisach and the Brisach Bridge. Synchronizing the attacks, the bridge was seized and Neuf Brisach captured by crossing the protecting moat and scaling the medieval walls by ladder. In one of the hardest fought and bloodiest campaigns of the war, the 3d Infantry Division annihilated three enemy divisions, partially destroyed three others, captured over 4,000 prisoners, and inflicted more than 7,500 casualties on the enemy.[5]

32nd Infantry Division U.S. Army 1943 Kokoda Track campaign, Battle of Buna-Gona General Orders Number 21, War Department, 6 May 1943: </br>"When (a) bold and aggressive enemy invaded Papua in strength, the combined action of ground and air units of these forces, in association with Allied units, checked the hostile advance, drove the enemy back to the seacoast and in a series of actions against a highly organized defensive zone, utterly destroyed him. Ground combat forces, operating over roadless jungle-covered mountains and swamps, demonstrated their courage and resourcefulness in closing with an enemy who took every advantage of the nearly impassable terrain. Air forces, by repeatedly attacking the enemy ground forces and installations, by destroying his convoys attempting reinforcement and supply, and by transporting ground forces and supplies to areas for which land routes were non-existent and sea routes slow and hazardous, made possible the success of the ground operations. Service units, operating far forward of their normal positions and at times in advance of ground combat elements, built landing fields in the jungle, established and operated supply points, and provided for the hospitalization and evacuation of the wounded and sick. The courage, spirit, and devotion to duty of all elements of the command made possible the complete victory attained."[6]
2nd Battalion, 274th Infantry Regiment, 70th Infantry Division U.S. Army 1945 Wingen
Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon, 394th Infantry Regiment, 99th Infantry Division U.S. Army 1981 Battle of Bulge On October 26, 1981, after considerably lobbying and letter-writing by Lt. Lyle Bouck, members of the unit were finally decorated. Fourteen of the 18 members were present. Secretary of the Army John O. Marsh presented the recognition. </br></br>The Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon, 394th Infantry Regiment, 99th Infantry Division, distinguished itself by extraordinary heroism, in action against enemy forces on 16 December 1944 near Lanzerath. Belgium. The German Ardennes Offensive that began the Battle of the Bulge was directed initially against a small sector defended by the Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon. Following a two-hour artillery barrage, enemy forces of at least battalion strength launched three separate frontal attacks against the small Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon of 18 men. Each attack was successfully repelled by the platoon. The platoon position was becoming untenable as casualties mounted and ammunition was nearly exhausted. Plans were made to break contact with the enemy and withdraw under cover of darkness. Before this could be accomplished, a fourth enemy attack finally overran the position and the platoon was captured at bayonet point. Although greatly outnumbered, through numerous feats of valor and an aggressive and deceptive defense of their position, the platoon inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy forces and successfully delayed for nearly 24 hours a major spearhead of the attacking German forces. Their valorous actions provided crucial time for the American forces to prepare to defend against the massive German offensive. The extraordinary gallantry, determination and esprit de corps of the Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon in close combat against a numerically superior enemy force are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon the Unit and the Armed Forces of the United States.
26th Infantry Division U.S. Army 1945 Ardennes-Alsace
Combat Command "B", 7th Armored Division U.S. Army 1948 St. Vith (Ardennes Campaign) Dept. of the Army GO #48, dated 12 July 1948: </br></br>"Combat Command B. 7th Armored Division, composed of the following units: Headquarters and Headquarters Company; 17th Tank Battalion; 31st Tank Battalion; 23d Armored Infantry Battalion; 38th Armored Infantry Battalion; 87th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron Mechanized (less Troop D); 275th Armored Field Artillery Battalion; 434th Armored Field Artillery Battalion; 965th Field Artillery Battalion; 81st Engineer Combat Battalion (106th Infantry Division); 168th Engineer Combat Battalion; 1st Platoon, Company F, 423d Infantry Regiment (amended from 3rd Platoon in Defense Department Permanent Order #032-01, dated 1 February 1999); Company B, 33d Armored Engineer Battalion; and Company A, 814th Tank Destroyer Battalion (SP), is cited for outstanding performance of duty in action from 17 to 23 December 1944, inclusive, at St. Vith, Belgium. Combat Command B, 7th Armored Division, was subjected to repeated tank and infantry attacks, which grew in intensity as the German forces attempted to destroy the stubborn defenses that were denying to them the use of the key communication center at St. Vith. By the second day, the flanks were constantly threatened by enemy forces that had bypassed the St. Vith area and pushed far to the rear in an effort to encircle the command east of the Salm River. The attacking forces were repeatedly thrown back by the gallant troops who rose from their fox holes and fought in fierce hand to hand combat to stop the penetrations and inflict heavy losses on the numerically superior foe. As the command continued to deny the important St. Vith highway and railroad center to the Germans, the entire offensive lost its initial impetus and their supply columns became immobilized. By 21 December, the German timetable was so disrupted that the enemy was forced to divert a corps to the capture of St. Vith. Under extreme pressure from overwhelming forces, this command, which for 6 days had held the St. Vith area so gallantly, was ordered to withdraw west of the Salm River. By their epic stand, without prepared defenses and despite heavy casualties, Combat Command B,. 7th Armored Division inflicted crippling losses and imposed great delay upon the enemy by a masterful and grimly determined defense in keeping with the highest traditions of the Army of the United States."
551st Parachute Infantry Battalion of the 82nd Airborne Division U.S. Army 1944 Battle of the Bulge, Rochelinval, Belgium for "exceptional heroism" at the beginning of the American counteroffensive in the Ardennes, Belgium, noting the "heroic attack and seizure of the critical, heavily fortified, regimental German position" of Rochelinval on the Salm River. A separate battalion attached to the 82nd Airborne Division, the 551st began its grueling days as the Division's spearhead by successfully executing a raid on advanced German positions at Noirfontaine on 27 and 28 December 1944, delivering to XVIII Airborne Corps vital intelligence for the Allied counteroffensive soon to come. On 3 January 1945, the 551st from the division's line of departure at Basse Bodeux attacked against great odds and secured the imposing ridge of Herispehe. The next day, January 8, Hitler ordered the German Army's first pullback from the Battle of the Bulge. In fighting a numerically superior foe with dominant high ground advantage, the 551st lost over four-fifths of its men, including the death of its inspirational commander, Lieutenant Colonel Wood Joerg, as he led the last attack. The battalion accounted for 400 German dead, and took over 300 prisoners. The 551st Parachute Infantry Battalion fought with a tenacity and fervor that was extraordinary. In what United States Army historian Charles MacDonald called "the greatest battle ever fought by the United States Army," the 551st demonstrated the very best of the Army tradition of performance of duty in spite of great sacrifice and against all odds.

(Awarded on February 23, 2001, by U.S. Army Chief of Staff Gen. Eric K. Shinseki during an official ceremony at the Pentagon.)

21st Tank Battalion, Combat Command B, 10th Armored Division U.S. Army 1944 Battle of Bastogne On December 18, 1944, the 10th's charge across Europe was halted due to the Ardennes Offensive. The 10th Armored Division executed a 90 degree turn and rushed 75 miles into the German onslaught. Combat Command B were sent directly into Bastogne with orders to hold. For over eight hours CCB held Bastogne alone, against eight German Divisions. When the 101 Airborne Division arrived both military outfits were surrounded and trapped. However CCB and the 101 Airborne Division maintained a defensive posture and held until the German offensive burned out several days later. At the Conclusion of the battle, the 21st Tank Battalion was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation for their extraordinary heroism from December 17, to December 27, 1944 Battle of the Bulge.
Company "A",[7] 612th Tank Destroyer Battalion, U.S. Army December 12–29, 1944 Hofen, Germany Battle of the Bulge During the period of 12 December 1944 to 29 December 1944 in the vicinity of Höfen, Germany, Company Company A, 612th Tank Destroyer Battalion distinguished itself by exhibiting outstanding courage and superior heroism in the presence of the enemy. The officers and men of Company Company A, 612th Tank Destroyer Battalion, by spirited arid out-standing aggressiveness, were successful in preventing a breakthrough by the enemy in the sector occupied by the 3rd Battalion of the 395th Infantry Regiment. During the entire action the personnel of Company A, 612th Tank Destroyer Battalion were employed in the role of infantry, one for which they were not trained nor to which assigned, fighting with the courage and spirit of infantrymen and being responsible for, the capture of many enemy personnel and enemy materiel as well as the killing of numerous Germans. Their outstanding courage, bravery and discipline exhibited to all that this was a superior fighting unit and was instrumental in resisting the northern arm of the German Pincer aimed for Eupen, Belgium through Monschau, Germany. Had the enemy offensive successfully overrun the positions of Company A 612th Tank Destroyer Battalion, the entire northern flank of the First United States Army would have been endangered, and the major supply depots in the vicinity of Eupen and Verviers threatened.
761st Tank Battalion U.S. Army 1978 ETO, World War II
1st Battalion, 43rd Air Defense Art. U.S. Army Guadalcanal Army citation
146th Engineer (Combat) Battalion U.S. Army 1944 Operation Overlord Landed H+03 minutes, Omaha Beach, D-Day, June 6, 1944
695th Armored Field Artillery Battalion U.S. Army 1945 Invasion behind enemy lines and capture of the French city Metz.
34th Field Artillery US Army 1943 North Africa
51st Combat Engineer Battalion US Army 1945 Ardennes Defense of several key Belgian cities against Kampfgruppe Peiper between December 17–22, 1944.
1st Battalion, 307th Infantry Regiment of the 77th Infantry Division U.S. Army 1945 Okinawa, le Shima "For assaulting, capturing and securing The Escarpment, a heavily fortified coral rock fortress which was the key to the famed Japanese Shuri defensive position on Okinawa, during the period 30 April to 5 May 1945, and making possible a general advance by all elements of the command."
505th Parachute Infantry Regiment of the 82nd Airborne Division U.S. Army 1944 D-Day - Normandy for action at Sainte-Mère-Église
First Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment (less Company “A”) of the 82nd Airborne Division U.S. Army 1945 Operation Market Garden - Cheneux, Belgium

HEADQUARTERS 82D AIRBORNE DIVISION Office of the Division Commander A.P.O. 469, U.S. Army, 23 March 1945 GENERAL ORDERS UNIT CITATION NUMBER 43

The First Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry (less Company “A”) has been cited by the Commanding General, First United States Army, for outstanding performance of duty in action against the enemy. The citation is as follows:

The First Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry (less Company “A”) is cited for outstanding performance of duty in action against the enemy on 20–21 December 1944, at Cheneux, Belgium. This force was ordered to seize and occupy the town which is situated on hilly terrain and was defended by a heavily reinforced battalion of armored SS Troops supported by a Mark VI tank, numerous machine guns, SP 20 mm guns, SP 77 mm guns, and 105 mm howitzers. The position was further defended in depth by armored halftracks mounting triple 20 mm cannon and SP 81mm mortars. The battalion attacked Cheneux in echelons of assault waves and stormed the strongly emplaced enemy through the heavy fire of 20 mm cannon, machine gun, mortar and small arms. The first three waves suffered severe losses as they charged across 400 yards of open fields fenced with barbed wire. Despite heavy losses, these airborne soldiers kept going with grim determination, each succeeding wave getting closer until the enemy and his armored vehicles and cannon were finally overwhelmed in fierce hand-to-hand combat. When ammunition ran low the troopers drove the enemy from almost impregnable positions with bayonets and clubbed rifles. The stubborn enemy was completely routed from his perimeter defenses and the attack continued until a portion of Cheneux was seized, where reorganization was effected and preparations made for a counter-attack. At dawn, the enemy laid down a heavy artillery preparation, then launched five successive counter-attacks through the day. All of these were repelled and at dusk this undaunted force continued the attack and drove the Germans from the town and nearby high ground. In this battle for CHENEUX, the First Battalion of the 504th Parachute Infantry (less Company “A”), destroyed five companies of German SS Armored troops and large quantities of artillery, vehicles and one Mark VI tank. They sealed a trap for thirty tanks and ninety-five vehicles which were eventually completely destroyed. This airborne force sustained heavy casualties in the engagement, but, despite these losses and the fanatical ferocity with which the enemy defended key positions, it prevailed in a most outstanding manner through superb discipline, skill and teamwork. The superior fortitude, unparalleled élan and individual feats of gallantry and high courage on the part of every man and officer reflect credit on the traditions of the airborne forces of the United States Army.

Company "A", 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment of the 82nd Airborne Division U.S. Army 1945 Co. A for crossing Rhine River at Hitdorf, Germany on 6 April 1945

Company "A" 504th Parachute Infantry, is cited for outstanding performance of duty in the armed conflict against the enemy in Germany on 6–7 April 1945. This company crossed the Rhine River at 02–30 hours 6 April 1945, and seized the mile-long town of Hitdorf on the east shore with the mission of providing a base for further patrolling and to cause the German High Command to commit disproportionate forces against them in the belief that it was to be a major river crossing. The enemy immediately counter-attacked, but the assault groups were met with great vigor and virtually destroyed to a man. Apparently under the impression that a strong American bridgehead had been established overnight, the Germans assembled and directed a considerable portion of two divisions to the mission of containing and annihilating the formidable thrust. In mid-afternoon the entire area was subjected to a withering and devastating artillery barrage for two hours after which counter-attacking forces in overwhelming strength with tank support assaulted the defending troopers from every direction and penetrated to the heart of the town. The troopers of Company A doggedly stood their ground, fought at close quarters, and at point blank range and inflicted terrible casualties on the masses of the enemy. Fighting with relentless ferocity throughout the afternoon and night, this gallant company held its ground and carried out its mission until it was finally ordered to withdraw to the west bank of the Rhine on the night of 6–7 April. Fighting was bitter and at close quarters. The German armor committed was destroyed with hand weapons, most of the troopers using captured German panserfausts. The company fought its way back step by step during the hours of darkness to their boats. The courageous and skillful efforts of the officers and men of this brave group, although outnumbered numerically at least eight to one, is reflected in the total number of casualties inflicted on the German forces during the day's fighting . Eighty prisoners were taken and evacuated and conservative estimates indicate that 150 of the enemy were killed and 250 wounded. The conduct of Company A reflects great credit on the Airborne Forces of the United States Army.[8]

505th Parachute Infantry Regiment of the 82nd Airborne Division U.S. Army 1944 Operation Market Garden - Groesbeek, Holland
96th Infantry Division U.S. Army 2001 Okinawa Entire Division
2nd Battalion and one platoon of Company A, 749th Tank Battalion and one platoon of Company A, 776th Tank Destroyer Battalion of the 44th Infantry Division (United States) U.S. Army 1945 France Defensive action starting on December 31, 1944, against the German offensive Operation Nordwind in Rimling, France.
503rd Regimental Combat Team U.S. Army 1945 Battle of Corregidor (1945) Liberation the island of Corregidor in Manila Bay, 16–26 February.
222nd Infantry Regiment U.S. Army 2001 Alsace 24 & 25 January 1945 withstood repeated attacks from three enemy divisions
Third Platoon, Company C of the 614th Tank Destroyer Battalion U.S. Army 1945 Alsace 14 December 1944 Set up their guns in full view of the enemy, acting as a decoy so other units could attack and take the town of Climback, France
5307th Composite Unit ("Merrill's Marauders") U.S. Army 1966[1] northern Burma
601st Tank Destroyer Battalion U.S. Army 1942 Battle of El Guettar 23 March 1942 broke up an attack by strong elements of the 10th Panzer Division, destroying 37 tanks and receiving the Presidential Unit Citation. This has the interesting distinction of being the only time a battalion would fight in the way envisaged by the original "tank destroyer" concept, as an organized independent unit opposing an armored force in open terrain. Received a second Presidential Unit Citation for heavy action in the Colmar Pocket, destroying 18 tanks.
3rd Battalion, 351st Infantry Regiment U.S. Army 1944 9 July to 13 July 1944 - Five days of heavy combat; 425 prisoners taken; 250 enemy killed or wounded.
100th Infantry Battalion U.S. Army 1944 Belvedere and Sassetta, Italy War Department General Orders 66, 15 August 1944: 26 and 27 June 1944 - The stubborn desire of the men to close with a numerically superior enemy and the rapidity with which they fought enabled the 100th Infantry Battalion to destroy completely the right flank positions of a German army, killing at least 178 Germans, wounding approximately 20, capturing 73, and forcing the remainder of a completely disrupted battalion to surrender approximately 10 kilometers of ground. In addition, large quantities of enemy weapons, vehicles, and equipment were either captured or destroyed.
100th Infantry Battalion U.S. Army 1944 Bruyeres, Biffontaine, and in the Foret Domaniale de Champ, France War Department General Orders 78, 12 September 1945: 15 to 30 October 1944 - The 100th Battalion was again committed to the attack. Going to the rescue of the "lost battalion, 141st Infantry Regiment, it fought without respite for 4 days against a fanatical enemy that was determined to keep the "lost battalion" isolated and force its surrender. On the fourth day, although exhausted and reduced through casualties to about half its normal strength, the battalion fought doggedly forward against strong enemy small-arms and mortar fire until it contacted the isolated unit.
442 Regimental Combat Team U.S. Army 1945 Serravezza, Carrara, and Fosdinovo, Italy War Department General Orders 34, 10 April 1946, as amended by War Department General Orders 106, 20 September 1946: 5 to 14 April 1945 - It accomplished the mission of creating a diversion along the Ligurian Coast, which served as a feint for the subsequent break-through of the Fifth Army forces into Bologna and the Po Valley. The successful accomplishment of this mission turned a diversionary action into a full scale and victorious offensive, which played an important part in the dual destruction of the German armies In Italy.
2nd Battalion, 442 Regimental Combat Team U.S. Army 1944–1945 Bruyeres, France; Biffontaine, France; and Massa, Italy War Department General Orders 83, 6 August 1946: 19 October 1944, 28 and 29 October 1944, 6 to 10 April 1945 - The 2d Battalion executed a brilliant tactical operation in capturing Hill 503, to expedite the forward movement beyond Bruyeres, France and to erase the German threat from the rear. On 28 October 1944, the 2d Battalion secured its objective in a 2-day operation, which eliminated a threat to the flanks of two American divisions. In the face of intense enemy barrages and numerous counterattacks, the infantrymen of this battalion fought their way through difficult jungle-like terrain in freezing weather and completely encircled the enemy. Maintaining its admirable record of achievement in the vicinity of Massa, Italy the 2nd Battalion smashed through and exploited the strong Green Line on the Ligurian Coast. Surging over formidable heights through strong resistance, the 2nd Battalion, in 5 days of continuous, heavy fighting, captured a series of objectives to pave the way for the entry into the important communications centers of Massa and Carrara, Italy, without opposition. In this operation, the 2nd Battalion accounted for more than 200 Germans and captured or destroyed large quantities of enemy material.
3rd Battalion, 442 Regimental Combat Team U.S. Army 1944 Biffontaine, France War Department General Orders 68, 14 August 1945: 27 to 30 October 1944 - One of the battalions of another unit which had been advancing deep into enemy territory beyond the town of Biffontaine was suddenly surrounded by the enemy, and separated from all friendly units by an enemy force estimated at 700 men. The mission of the 3rd Battalion was to attack abreast with the 100th Battalion and four other battalions and relieve the entrapped unit. Though seriously depleted in manpower, the battalion hurled back two determined enemy counterattacks, and after reducing a heavily mined roadblock finally established contact with the besieged battalion.
Companies F and L, 442 Regimental Combat Team U.S. Army 1944 Belmont, France War Department General Orders 14, 4 March 1945: 21 October 1944 - Companies F and L, 442nd Regimental Combat Team, designated the O'Connor Task Force, launched an attack down the north slope of the wooded ridge, Foret de Belmont. In destroying the enemy main line of resistance and advancing the divisional front lines by approximately 2,000 meters, the task force captured 56 prisoners, killed 80 of the enemy, and captured considerable quantifies of enemy material and equipment.
232d Engineer Combat Company (then attached to the 111th Engineer Combat Battalion), 36th Infantry Division U.S. Army 1944 Bruyeres, France War Department General Orders 56, 17 June 1946: 23 October to 11 November 1944 - Even though the engineers sustained 57 casualties in dead and wounded, they captured 27 German prisoners and killed many more as they worked. Almost continuous rain and snow made their task more difficult, and yet by sheer determination and grit, these men accomplished this magnificent feat of engineering. Without this road, the division operation could not have succeeded and it is due to the extraordinary achievement of the 11th Engineer Combat Battalion with the 232d Engineer Combat Company (attached) that the 36th Division was able to outflank the enemy forces in the Laveline-Corcieux Valley and pursue a disorganized enemy to the banks of the Meurthe River.

US Army Air Forces

Unit Service Year awarded Campaign or battle Other notes
387th Bombardment Group U.S. Army Air Force 1945 Mayen, Germany Railroad Bridge The 387th Bombardment Group is cited for extraordinary heroism in armed conflict with the enemy on 23 December 1944, when the group was dispatched to attack a vital and strongly defended railway bridge at Mayen, Germany. While en route to the target the second box of B-26 airplanes, which was without fighter escort and was separated by several miles from the first box, was viciously attacked by from 15 to 25 Messerschmitt aircraft. Despite the determined defensive fire which took a large toll of the hostile fighters, the enemy pressed his attacks with such fury that the low flight was overpowered and four B-26 aircraft were forced down in flames. Although in the ensuing encounters every airplane in the remaining two flights sustained damage from the enemy attacks, the gallant airmen succeeded in driving four of the enemy airplanes to certain destruction and forcing four more to break away in flames. Meanwhile the first box pressed on to the target despite intermittent flank and the imminence of fighter attack. Although a pathfinder failure occurred 1 minute before bomb-release time, the bombardiers synchronized on the target with such accuracy that extensive damage was inflicted on the bridge. Notwithstanding the heavy losses incurred during the enemy attacks the second box returned for an additional run on the target, and as a result of their determined efforts the central portion of the bridge span was completely destroyed. Despite the severe damage inflicted on the group's aircraft during the morning mission, the officers and men of the 387th Bombardment Group displayed great determination in embarking on another mission only 2 hours after the bombers had returned to base. A withering hail of antiaircraft fire was encountered over the target area at Prum, Germany, which damaged 21 of the 26 airplanes dispatched. In the face of this sustained barrage of flak the courageous airmen released their bombs with a high degree of accuracy upon the communications installations. In carrying out this dual blow against the enemy's communication and transportation facilities on this date, the officers and men of the 387th Bombardment Group displayed aerial skill, resolution, and devotion to duty in keeping with the finest traditions of the Army Air Forces. (General Orders 140, Headquarters Ninth Air Force, 23 July 1945, as approved by the Commanding General, United States Forces, European Theater (Main).

By command of Major General Weyland

Awarded on August 14, 1945 at the Eiffel Tower, Paris, France by Major General William E. Kepner, Commander of the Ninth Air Force.

387th Bombardment Group Distinguished Unit Citation

2d Bombardment Group U.S. Army 1944 Mission 150 24 February 1944 mission to Steyr, Austria
2d Bombardment Group U.S. Army 1944 Mission 151 25 February 1944 mission to Regensburg, Germany. Marks the only time in U.S. military aviation history that a unit is awarded back to back citations for actions on successive days.[9]
46th Squadron, 21st Fighter group U.S. Army 1945 Cited 13 November 1945 for outstanding performance of duty in 7 April 1945 armed conflict with the enemy while escorting B-29 Superfortress attack on the heavily-defended Nakajima aircraft factory near Tokyo. Launching from Iwo Jima, this was also the first fighter-escort of bombers over Japan.[10]
56th Fighter Group U.S. Army 1944 Missions against German aircraft plants and assembly centers. During the period from 20 February to 9 March 1944, the 56th Fighter Group destroyed 98 enemy aircraft, probably destroyed 9 more and damaged 52 aircraft.[11]
56th Fighter Group U.S. Army 1944 Operation Market Garden On 18 September 1944, the 56th Fighter Group flew an extremely dangerous mission to suppress enemy flak positions in support of the airborne landings in Holland. The mission was successfully carried out but resulted in the loss of 16 of 39 aircraft with another 15 damaged.[12][11]
57th Pursuit Group U.S. Army 1943 The group destroyed more than 70 of the enemy's transport and fighter aircraft in an aerial battle over the Gulf of Tunis on April 18, 1943, and received a Distinguished Unit Citation.
57th Pursuit Group U.S. Army 1943 For front-line operations in direct support of the Eighth Army from the Second Battle of El Alamein to the capitulation of enemy forces in Sicily, the group received another Distinguished Unit Citation.
99th Pursuit Squadron U.S. Army 1943 For the reduction to surrender of the island of Pantelleria, Italy, via the sole means of air power, a historical first.
319th Bombardment Group U.S. Army 1944 In March, it earned two Distinguished Unit Citations for raids on marshalling yards in Rome and Florence that damaged enemy communications without destroying cultural monuments.
330th Bombardment Group U.S. Army 1945 Mission 27 & 46 The group received a Distinguished Unit Citation for incendiary raids on the industrial sections of Tokushima and Gifu and for a strike against the hydroelectric power center at Kofu, Japan, in July 1945. The group received another DUC for attacking the Nakajima-Musashino aircraft engine plant near Tokyo in August 1945[13]
367th Fighter Group U.S. Army 1945 Luftwaffe airfields at Clastres, Péronne and Rosières. For its achievements on August 25, the 367th Fighter Group received the Presidential Unit Citation, the highest possible award for a unit in combat.
367th Fighter Group U.S. Army 1945 German Army Headquarters for the entire Western Front. For this successful undertaking the 367th Fighter Group was awarded an Oak Leaf Cluster to the Presidential Unit Citation.
484th Bombardment Group US Army Air Force 1944 Innsbruck On 13 Jun 1944 a heavy smoke screen prevented the group from bombing marshalling yards at Munich; however, in spite of severe damage from flak and interceptors, and despite heavy gunfire encountered at the alternate target, the group bombed marshalling yards at Innsbruck and received a DUC for its persistent action.
484th Bombardment Group US Army Air Force 1944 Vienna Received second DUC for performance on 21 Aug 1944 when, unescorted, the organization fought its way through intense opposition to attack underground oil storage installations in Vienna.
11th Bombardment Group US Army Air Force 31 July-30 November 1942 South Pacific For action against enemy forces in the Solomon Islands (Guadalcanal) in support of the U.S. Navy.
17th Bombardment Group U.S. Army 1945 Schweinfurt First Tactical Air Force (Provisional), APO 374, 19 May 1945, General Orders Number 128, The 17th Bombardment Group

For outstanding performance of duty in action against the enemy in the European Theater of Operations on 10 April 1945. Following the Rhine River crossings made on a large scale by allied Armies, the 42nd United States Infantry Divisions arrived at the out skirts of the fortress city of Schweinfurt, Germany, an important communications center. With its advance towards Nuremberg and Munich impeded by numerous strong points in this city, which constituted one of the principle German held defense bastions, it was necessary to neutralize Schweinfurt by air bombardment. The magnificent air cooperation provided the 42nd Division by the 42nd bombardment Wing on this noteworthy occasion is an eloquent tribute to the effectiveness of air ground coordination and teamwork. The preeminent part played by the 17th Bombardment Group set it above and apart from other units participating in the same engagement and insured the effectiveness of these operations as a whole. After taking off from their base at Dijon, France, at 09.15 hours on 10 April 1945, sixty-eight B-26 aircraft from the Group commenced their bombing run near the objective amid a barrage of heavy and accurate anti-aircraft fire which damaged fifteen of the attacking Marauders. The twelve flights of bombers resolutely persevered on their course over the target in perfect formation and accomplished the bombing with incredible precision. Photo reconnaissance revealed that the 133 tons of bombs released on the objective by the 17th Bombardment Group achieved unparalleled destruction. Such extensive damage was inflicted upon the city by blast and fire that the military effectiveness of the enemy troops defending the city was paralyzed. The success of the mission, so typical of the superior bombing of the 17th Bombardment Group, was so catastrophic for the enemy that the 42nd Division was able to seize Schweinfurt with virtually no opposition, thereby accelerating the advance of the Seventh Army towards Nuremberg and Munich, thus bringing to a more rapid conclusion the ultimate victory of the Allies. The thoroughness of the mission planning and the precision of the execution attests to the efficiency, élan, and determination of the combat crews. The superior results achieved are attributable to the extensive cooperation and devotion to duty displayed by the ground crews and the administration staffs who made possible such an exceptional achievement. The enormous damage inflicted upon the enemy installations by the 17th Bombardment Group in the Mediterranean and European Theater of Operations, during a period of twenty-nine consecutive months of air warfare was accomplished by a consistently high bombing accuracy which is believed to be without precedent. Through its unique and highly successful performance against the enemy in six hundred and six bombing missions, the 17th Bombardment Group has won for itself an enviable position in the Army Air Forces which reflected the greatest credit upon the Group conforming to the most illustrious traditions of the United States military service. By Command of Major General Webster. C. E. Crumrine Colonel, AC Chief of Staff

92nd Bombardment Group US Army Air Force 1944 Oschersleben, Germany Field Order _; Tuesday, 11 JAN 1944; Primary Target: Oschersleben, Secondary Target: Halberstadt, Formation: The 92nd Bomb Group (325th, 326th, 327th, 407th Squadrons) 40th Combat Wing, the 325th flew High Squadron-High Group, 407th Low Squadron.
389th Bomb Group US Army Air Corp August 1, 1943 Campina, Ploesti, Rumania
483rd Bombardment Group US Army Air Force 1944 Memmingen For outstanding performance of duty in action against the enemy on 18 July 1944. In connection with the counter air offensive against vitally import and high priority targets in Germany, the 483rd Bombardment Group (H) was ordered to attach and destroy the enemy airdrome and installations at Memmingen. Enroute to the target, the Group became separated from the other Groups in the formation and from the fighter escort by extremely severe and adverse weather conditions. Alone, the Group proceeded to the target area where it was aggressively attached by approximately two hundred (200) enemy fighters. In the air battle which ensued, gunners of the Group shot down or damaged sixty-six (66) enemy aircraft at the same time losing fourteen (14) airplanes with their entire crews. Undismayed by the ferocity and viciousness of the attack and in spite of the severe losses suffered, the remainder of the Group proceeded, and with great heroism, gallantry and determination, carried out the bombing attack as ordered, though under the concentrated gunfire of the entire enemy fighter force. The bombs were dropped on the target with devastating effect, destroying all major installations and destroying or damaging an additional thirty-five (35) grounded enemy aircraft. Throughout the entire action which was carried out with exceptional gallantry and determination, and in spite of overwhelming opposition, crew esprit and individual heroism could not be excelled. By their professional skill and devotion to duty, their extraordinary display of heroism in the face of unparalleled odds and the exceptionally gallant manner in which this attack was carried out, combat and ground personnel, 483rd Bombardment Group (H), have reflected great credit upon themselves and the Armed Forces of the United States of America.[14]

Navy

USS Redfish (SS-395) U.S. Navy 1945 Midway / Pacific Campaign

USS REDFISH 395 received a PRESIDENTIAL UNIT CITATION which read "For extraordinary heroism in action during the First and Second War Patrols against enemy Japanese surface units in the restricted waters of the Pacific. Operating In bold defiance of foul weather and persistent hostile depth charging, gunfire and bombing by outnumbering forces of radar-equipped ships, air escorts and patrol craft, the U.S.S. REDFISH launched her accurate and intensive gun and torpedo fire during brief periods of concentrated attack to sink a new Japanese aircraft carrier with her entire complement of embarked planes and equipment destined to be used against our forces, to damage severely another vital carrier and to destroy or cripple much additional shipping necessary to the enemy’s continued prosecution of the war. Although forced to the bottom In 230 feet of water by vicious countermeasures, with her pressure hull cracked and numerous leaks throughout, the REDFISH responded gallantly to the superb handling of her skilled and aggressive ship's company and succeeded in evading further damage and returning to port. Her brilliant record of success in combat and her indomitable fighting spirit in the face of the most determined and fierce counterattacks by an alert and relentless enemy reflect the highest credit upon the REDFISH, her valiant officers and men and the United States Naval Service."

USS O'Bannon (DD-450) U.S. Navy 1943 Solomon Islands Campaign

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the PRESIDENTIAL UNIT CITATION to the UNITED STATES SHIP USS O’BANNON (DD-450) for service as set forth in the following CITATION: "For outstanding performance in combat against enemy Japanese forces in the South Pacific from October 7, 1942, to October 7, 1943. An aggressive veteran after a year of continuous and intensive operations in this area, the U.S.S. O’BANNON has taken a tremendous toll of vital Japanese warships, surface vessels and aircraft. Launching a close range attack on hostile combatant ships off Guadalcanal on the night of November 13, 1942, the O’BANNON scored three torpedo hits on a Japanese battleship, boldly engaged two other men o’ war with gunfire and retired safely in spite of damage sustained. During three days of incessant hostilities in July 1943, she gallantly stood down Kula Gulf to bombard enemy shore positions in coverage of our assault groups, later taking a valiant part in the rescue of survivors from the torpedoed U.S.S STRONG while under fierce coastal battery fire and aerial bombing attack and adding her fire power toward the destruction of a large Japanese naval force. In company with two destroyers, the O’BANNON boldly intercepted and repulsed nine hostile warships off Vella Lavella on October 7, 1943, destroying two enemy ships and damaging others. Although severely damaged, she stood by to take aboard and care for survivors of a friendly torpedoed destroyer and retired to base under her own power. The O’BANNON’s splendid achievements and the gallant fighting spirit of her officers and men reflect great credit upon the United States Naval Service." For the President, /s/ Frank Knox, Secretary of the Navy

USS Alchiba (AKA-6) U.S. Navy 1943 Guadalcanal Campaign Navy Citation, for service at Guadalcanal from August through December 1942:

"The vessel arrived off Guadalcanal on 7 August, disembarked her troops, unloaded her cargo, and left the Solomons two days later, bound for New Caledonia. Alchiba returned to Guadalcanal on 18 September. After unloading cargo to support marines struggling for that island, she sailed back to New Caledonia for more supplies and returned to Guadalcanal on 1 November. She was anchored off Lunga Point at 0616 on 28 November, when two torpedoes from the Japanese submarine 1-16 exploded on the vessel s port side. At that time, her hold was loaded with drums of gasoline and ammunition, and the resulting explosion shot flames Template:Convert/ftTemplate:Convert/test/A in the air. The commanding officer ordered the ship to get underway to run her up on the beach. This action undoubtedly saved the ship. Hungry flames raged in the ship for over five days before weary fire fighting parties finally brought them under control. Salvage operations began soon thereafter. Most of her cargo was saved, and temporary repairs were in progress when Alchiba was torpedoed again on 7 December. An enemy submarine's conning tower had been spotted shortly before two torpedoes were fired. One passed close under the cargo ship's stern, but the other struck her port side near the engine room. The blast killed three men, wounded six others, and caused considerable structural damage. Once the fires and flooding were controlled, salvage operations resumed and enabled the ship to get underway for Tulagi on 27 December 1942."[15]

USS Archerfish (SS-311) U.S. Navy 1944

For sinking the Japanese aircraft carrier Shinano in November 1944 - the largest warship ever sunk by a submarine

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the PRESIDENTIAL UNIT CITATION to the UNITED STATES SHIP ARCHERFISH for service as set forth in the following CITATION:</br></br>

"For extraordinary heroism in action during the Fifth War Patrol against enemy Japanese combatant units in restricted waters of the Pacific. Relentless in tracking an alert and powerful hostile force which constituted a potential threat to our vital operations in the Philippine area, the U.S.S. ARCHERFISH culminated a dogged six and one-half-hour pursuit by closing her high speed target, daringly penetrated the strong destroyer escort screen, and struck fiercely at a large Japanese aircraft carrier (SHINANO) with all six of her torpedoes finding their mark to sink this extremely vital enemy ship. Subjected to devastating air and surface anti-submarine measures, the ARCHERFISH skillfully evaded her attackers by deep submergence and returned to port in safety. Handled with superb seamanship, she responded gallantly to the fighting determination of the officers and men and dealt a fatal blow to one of the enemy's major Fleet units despite the most merciless Japanese opposition and rendered valiant service toward the ultimate destruction of a crafty and fanatic enemy." For the President, /s/ James Forrestal Secretary of the Navy

USS Barb (SS-220) U.S. Navy 1945

U.S. submarine campaign against the Japanese Empire

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the PRESIDENTIAL UNIT CITATION to the UNITED STATES SHIP BARB for service as set forth in the following CITATION:

"For extraordinary heroism in action during the Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, and Eleventh War Patrols against enemy Japanese surface forces in restricted waters of the Pacific. Persistent in her search for vital targets, the USS BARB relentlessly tracked down the enemy and struck with indomitable fury despite unfavorable attack opportunity and severe countermeasures. Handled superbly, she held undeviatingly to her aggressive course and, on contacting a concentration of hostile ships in the lower reaches of a harbor, boldly penetrated the formidable screen. Riding dangerously, surfaced, in shallow water, the BARB launched her torpedoes into the enemy group to score devastating hits on the major targets, thereafter retiring at high speed on the surface in a full hour's run through uncharted, heavily mined and rock obstructed waters. Inexorable in combat, the BARB also braved the perils of a topical typhoon to rescue fourteen British and Australian prisoners of war who had survived the torpedoing and sinking of a hostile transport ship en route from Singapore to the Japanese Empire. Determined in carrying the fight to the enemy, the BARB has achieved an illustrious record of gallantry in action, reflecting the highest credit upon her valiant officers and men and upon the United States Naval Service."

USS Enterprise (CV-6) U.S. Navy 1943 Air raids on the Marshall Islands (1942), Doolittle Raid, Battle of Midway, Battle of the Eastern Solomons, Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, Guadalcanal Campaign Navy Citation, for 7 December 1941 to 15 November 1942. First aircraft carrier to received the PUC. Most decorated U.S. Navy ship from World War II.[2]

"For consistently outstanding performance and distinguished achievement during repeated action against enemy Japanese forces in the Pacific war area, December 7, 1941, to November 15, 1942. Participating in nearly every major carrier engagement in the first year of the war, the Enterprise and her air group, exclusive of far-flung destruction of hostile shore installations throughout the battle area, did sink or damage on her own a total of 35 Japanese vessels and shoot down a total of 185 Japanese aircraft. Her aggressive spirit and superb combat efficiency are fitting tribute to the officers and men who so gallantly established her as an ahead bulwark in the defense of the American nation."

USS Cabot (CVL-28) U.S. Navy 1945 Airgroup 31. Marshall Islands, Truk, Palau, Hollandia, Marianas, Bonins, Yap, Philippines.

Airgroup 29. Ryukyus, Formosa, Philippines, Luzon, China Sea, Japan, Bonins.

One of 3 light aircraft carriers to be awarded the Presidential Unit Citation in WW II.

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the PRESIDENTIAL UNIT CITATION to the U.S.S. CABOT and her attached Air Groups participating in the following operations:

January 29 to February 16, 1944, Marshalls, Truk; March 29 to April 30, 1944, Palau, Hollandia, Truk; June 11 to August 5, 1944, Marianas, Bonins, Yap; September 6 to 24, 1944, Philippines, Palau, Yap: AG-31 (VF-31, VT-31).

October 10 to November 25, 1944, Ryukyus, Formosa, Philippines, Luzon; December 14 to 16, 1944, Luzon; January 3 to 22, 1945, Philippines, Formosa, China Sea, Ryukyus; February 16 to 25, 1945, Japan, Bonins; March 18 to April 8, 1945, Ryukyus, Japan: AG-29 (VF-29, VT-29).

for service as set forth in the following CITATION:

"For extraordinary heroism in action against enemy Japanese forces in the air, ashore and afloat in the Pacific War Area from January 29, 1944, to April 8, 1945. Operating continuously in the most forward areas, the U.S.S. CABOT and her air groups struck crushing blows toward annihilating Japanese fighting power; they provided air cover for our amphibious forces; they fiercely countered the enemy's aerial attacks and destroyed his planes; and they inflicted terrific losses on the Japanese in Fleet and merchant marine units sunk or damaged. Daring and dependable in combat, the CABOT with her gallant officers and men rendered loyal service in achieving the ultimate defeat of the Japanese Empire."

USS Houston (CA-30) U.S. Navy 1942,
1944
Java Campaign, ending with Second Battle of the Java Sea Navy Citation... "(f)or action in the Battle of Sunda Strait." Sunk in action with HMAS Perth against incredible odds. The two ships steamed into a Japanese invasion force and were sunk in the ensuing battle.
USS Hugh W. Hadley (DD-774) U.S. Navy 1945 Battle of Okinawa USS Hugh W. Hadley (DD-774)

"For extraordinary heroism in action as Fighter Direction Ship on Radar Picket Station Number 15 during an attack by approximately 100 enemy Japanese planes, forty miles northwest of the Okinawa Transport Area, May 11, 1945. Fighting valiantly against waves of hostile suicide and dive-bombing planes plunging toward her from all directions, the U.S.S. HUGH HADLEY sent up relentless barrages of antiaircraft fire during one of the most furious air-sea battles of the war. Repeatedly finding her targets, she destroyed twenty enemy planes, skillfully directed her Combat Air Patrol in shooting down at least forty others and, by her vigilance and superb battle readiness, avoided damage to herself until subjected to a coordinated attack by ten Japanese planes. Assisting in the destruction of all ten of these, she was crashed by one bomb and three suicide planes with devastating effect. With all engineering spaces flooded and with a fire raging amidships, the gallant officers and men of the HUGH W. HADLEY fought desperately against almost insurmountable odds and, by their indomitable determination, fortitude and skill, brought the damage under control, enabling their ship to be towed to port and saved. Her brilliant performance in this action reflects the highest credit upon the HUGH W. HADLEY and the United States Naval Service."

USS Pope (DD-225) U.S. Navy 1942,
1944
Java Campaign, ending
with Second Battle of the Java Sea
Navy Citation... "(f)or extraordinary heroism in action against enemy Japanese forces in the Java Campaign in the Southwest Pacific War Area, from January 23 to March 1, 1942...".[16]
USS Santee (CVE-29) U.S. Navy 1942 to 1945 CAG-29 (VGS-29, VGF-29), North Africa, November 8 to 11, 1942; CAG-29, Task Group 21.11, June 13 to August 6, 1943; CVEG-26, Palau, Yap, Ulithi, Woleai Raid, March 30 to April 1, 1944; CVEG-26, Western New Guinea Operation, April 22 to May 5, 1944; CVEG-26, Western New Guinea Operation, September 15 to 27, 1944; CVEG-26, Leyte Operation, October 12 to 27, 1944; CVEG-24, Okinawa Gunto Operation, March 25 to June 16, 1945; CVEG-24, Third Fleet Operations against Japan, July 10 to 15, 1945 USS Santee (CVE-29)

"For extraordinary heroism in action against enemy forces in the air, ashore and afloat. Operating in the most advanced areas, the U.S.S. SANTEE and her attached air squadrons struck with sustained fury at hostile warships, aircraft, merchant shipping and shore installations in the face of frequent and prolonged enemy air attacks. During the historic Battle for Leyte Gulf, the valiant SANTEE withstood successively the shattering explosion of a suicide plane in her flight deck and a torpedo hit in her side, stoutly conducting flight operations and fighting her antiaircraft guns throughout the period of emergency repairs. Despite the strain of constant alerts and long periods of unrelieved action, she sent out her planes to cover our landing operations and land offensives and to destroy the enemy's vital airfields and his camouflaged dispersal areas. The SANTEE's illustrious record of combat achievement reflects the highest credit upon her gallant officers and men and upon the United States Naval Service."

USS Sealion (SS-315) U.S. Navy 1945 U.S. submarine campaign against the Japanese Empire Navy Citation, for first through sixth war patrols - 8 June 1943 to 30 June 1945

"For extraordinary heroism in action during the Second and Third War Patrols against enemy Japanese surface forces in restricted waters of the Pacific. Operating dangerously in defiance of extremely strong air and surface opposition, the U.S.S. SEALION penetrated deep into hostile waters to maintain a steady offensive against ships vital to Japan's prosecution of the war. Consistently outnumbered and outgunned, she pursued her aggressive course in spite of formidable screens and severe anti-submarine measures to strike at every opportunity and, by her concentrated torpedo fire, delivered against convoys and combatant ships, sank thousands of tons of enemy shipping including one large battleship and a destroyer of a major hostile task force, and seriously damaged another battleship. Daring and skilled in carrying the fight to the enemy, the SEALION also braved the perils of a tropical typhoon to rescue fifty-four British and Australian prisoners of war, survivors of a hostile transport ship torpedoed and sunk while enroute from Singapore to the Japanese Empire. Her meritorious record of achievement is evidence of her own readiness for combat and the gallantry and superb seamanship of the officers and men who brought her through unscathed." For the President, /signed/ JAMES FORRESTAL Secretary of the Navy

USS Trigger (SS-237) U.S. Navy 1943 U.S. submarine campaign against the Japanese Empire Navy Citation, for fifth, sixth, and seventh war patrols - 30 April to 8 December 1943
USS Tirante (SS-420) U.S. Navy 1945 U.S. submarine campaign against the Japanese Empire Navy Citation for first war patrol - March 1945. Commanding Officer George L. Street III awarded Medal of Honor
Torpedo Squadron 8 (VT-8) (2 citations) U.S. Navy 1943 Battle of Midway For first combat mission, 4 June 1942. Second citation for Battle of Guadalcanal
Mine Division 34 (Pacific Fleet) U.S. Navy 1945 Borneo USS Sentry (Flagship)—Borneo Liberation Support
Task Unit 77.4.3
(aka "Taffy 3")
U.S. Navy 1944 Battle off Samar Taffy 3 was made up of six escort carriers, three destroyers and four destroyer escorts: USS St Lo (CVE-63) and VC-65, USS White Plains (CVE-66) and VC-4, USS Kalinin Bay (CVE-68) and VC-3, USS Fanshaw Bay (CVE-70) and VC-68, USS Kitkun Bay (CVE-71) and VC-5, USS Gambier Bay (CVE-73) and VC-10, USS Heermann (DD-532), USS Hoel (DD-533), USS Johnston (DD-557), USS John C. Butler (DE-339), USS Raymond (DE-341), USS Dennis (DE-405), USS Samuel B. Roberts (DE-413).

In the Battle off Samar, these 13 ships repelled the 23 battleships, heavy cruisers, light cruisers and destroyers of the Japanese Center Force engaged in the collection of naval battles associated with the landings at Leyte Gulf.

"For extraordinary heroism in action against powerful units of the Japanese Fleet during the Battle off Samar, Philippines, October 25, 1944. Silhouetted against the dawn as the Central Japanese Force steamed through San Bernardino Strait towards Leyte Gulf, Task Unit 77.4.3 was suddenly taken under attack by hostile cruisers on its port hand, destroyers on the starboard and battleships from the rear. Quickly laying down a heavy smoke screen, the gallant ships of the Task Unit waged battle fiercely against the superior speed and fire power of the advancing enemy, swiftly launching and rearming aircraft and violently zigzagging in protection of vessels stricken by hostile armor-piercing shells, anti-personnel projectiles and suicide bombers. With one carrier of the group sunk, others badly damaged and squadron aircraft courageously coordinating in the attacks by making dry runs over the enemy Fleet as the Japanese relentlessly closed in for the kill, two of the Unit's valiant destroyers and one destroyer escort charged the battleships point-blank and, expending their last torpedoes in desperate defense of the entire group, went down under the enemy's heavy shells as a climax to two and one half hours of sustained and furious combat. The courageous determination and the superb teamwork of the officers and men who fought the embarked planes and who manned the ships of Task Unit 77.4.3 were instrumental in effecting the retirement of a hostile force threatening our Leyte invasion operations and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service." For the President, /signed/ JAMES FORRESTAL Secretary of the Navy

This unit also awarded the Philippine Presidential Unit Citation Badge for the same action, dated October 12, 1984.

USS Aaron Ward (DM-34) U.S. Navy 1945 Battle of Okinawa

"For extraordinary heroism in action as a Picket Ship on Radar Picket Station during a coordinated attack by approximately twenty-five Japanese aircraft near Okinawa on May 3, 1945. Shooting down two Kamikazes which approached in determined suicide dives, the U.S.S. Aaron Ward was struck by a bomb from a third suicide plane as she fought to destroy this attacker before it crashed into her superstructure and sprayed the entire area with flaming gasoline. Instantly flooded in her after engineroom and fireroom, she battled against flames and exploding ammunition on deck and, maneuvering in a tight circle because of damage to her steering gear, countered another coordinated suicide attack and destroyed three Kamikazes in rapid succession. Still smoking heavily and maneuvering radically, she lost all power when her forward fireroom flooded under a seventh suicide plane which dropped a bomb close aboard and dived in flames into the main deck. Unable to recover from this blow before an eighth bomber crashed into her superstructure bulkhead only a few seconds later, she attempted to shoot down a ninth Kamikaze diving toward her at high speed and, despite the destruction of nearly all her gun mounts aft when this plane struck her, took under fire the tenth bomb-laden plane, which penetrated the dense smoke to crash on board with a devastating explosion. With fires raging uncontrolled, ammunition exploding and all engine spaces except the forward engineroom flooded as she settled in the water and listed to port, she began a nightlong battle to remain afloat and, with the assistance of a towing vessel, finally reached port the following morning. By her superb fighting spirit and the courage and determination of her entire company, the Aaron Ward upheld the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service."

USS Laffey (DD-459) U.S. Navy 1942 Naval Battle of Guadalcanal

Shortly after midnight on 13 November 1942, at the start of the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, the destroyer USS Laffey was crippled early in the battle yet engaged two Japanese battleships and two destroyers at point blank range. At one point Laffey was so close to the battleship Hiei that she was able to use her machine guns to cause critical damage to the control and communication systems on the bridge of the battleship, wound her commanding officer Admiral Hiroaki Abe, and kill Abe's chief of staff. Before she herself was sunk in the battle, Laffey contributed to the sinking of a cruiser and two destroyers.

USS Queenfish (SS-393) U.S. Navy 1944 U.S. submarine campaign against the Japanese Empire

For Patrols 1 and 2. Charles Elliott Loughlin in command.

Marine Corps

Unit Service Year awarded Campaign or battle Other notes
3rd Marines, Reinforced, serving as 3rd Combat team, 3rd Marine Division consisting of 3rd Marine Regiment, 2nd Battalion, 9th Regiment; Company "C", 3rd Tank Battalion: Company "C", 19th Marine Regiment (Combat Engineers), and 3rd Band Section Regiment (United States) US. Marine Corps July 21 to August 10, 1944 Battle of Guam Navy Citation..."For extraordinary heroism in action against enemy Japanese forces during the invasion and recapture of Guam, Maianas Islands, from July 21 to August 10, 1944. Crossing a 400-yard reef under frontal and flanking fire from strongly defended positions on dominating terrain, the 3rd Marine Regiment (Reinforced), serving as the 3rd Combat Team, assaulted the steep slopes of the objective and by evening has captured Adelupe Point and Chonito Cliff. With no reserve available to be committed in their zone of action during the ensuing 8 days, the gallant officers and men of this team fought their way forward through a maze of hostile caves and pillboxes and over rugged terrain to secure Fonte Canyon and the northeastern slopes of Fonte Ridge despite constant mortar, machine-gun, small-arms and artillery fire which blasted all echelons, shore party and lines of communication and supply. Seriously depleated by heavy casualties, including two battalion commanders, the 3rd Combat Team was continually in action as the left assault regiment until the cessation of organized resistance and the securing of the island on August 10, after 21 days of furious combat. By their effective teamwork, aggressive fighting spirit and individual acts of heroism and daring, the men of the 3rd Combat Team achieved an illustrious record of courage and skill in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service."
VMA-214 and 213 U.S. Marine Corps 1944 the Black Sheep Squadron—for their second combat tour, lasting 84 days at the end of 1943
2nd Marine Division U.S. Marine Corps 20–24 November 1943 Battle of Tarawa Navy Citation... "For outstanding performance in combat during the seizure and occupation of the Japanese-held Atoll of Tarawa, Gilbert Islands, November 20 to 24, 1943."
Wake Det, 1st Defense Bn and VMFA 211 U.S. Marine Corps 8-22 Dec 1941 Wake Island
MAG 22 and VMF-221 U.S. Marine Corps Jun 1942 Midway Island
1st Marine Division U.S. Marine Corps 7 August-9 December 1942 Solomon Islands
VMFA-214 U.S. Marine Corps 7 April 1943 17July-30 August 1943 16 September-19 October 1943 17 December 1943-6 January 1944 Battle of Guadalcanal, Munds, North Solomons, Vella Lavella and Torokina
2nd Marine Division U.S. Marine Corps 20–24 November 1943 Tarawa
4th Marine Division U.S. Marine Corps 15 June-1 August 1944 Battle of Saipan and Battle of Tinian
1st Marine Division U.S. Marine Corps 15–19 September 1944 Battle of Peleliu and Negesebus
VMFA-124 and 213 U.S. Marine Corps 16 Feb-11 May 1943 and 3–22 January 1945 USS Essex, Philippines, Formosa, South China Sea
VMFA 211 and VMFA 451 U.S. Marine Corps 16 February -11 May 1945 USS Bunker Hill, Japan, Bonins, and Ryukyu Islands
Assault Troops, 5th Amphibious Corps U.S. Marine Corps 19–28 February 1945 Iwo Jima
1st Marine Division U.S. Marine Corps 1 April-21 June 1945 Okinawa
6th Marine Division U.S. Marine Corps 1 April-21 June 1945 Okinawa
2nd MAW U.S. Marine Corps 4 April-14 July 1945 Okinawa
Marine Observation Squadron 3 U.S. Marine Corps 2 April- 21 June 1945 Okinawa
Marine Aircraft Group 12 U.S. Marine Corps 3 December 1944-9 March 1945 Philippine Islands

Korean War

Air Force

Unit Service Year awarded Campaign or battle Other notes
452d Bomb Wing U.S. Air Force 9 July 1951 - 27 November 1951 and 28 November 1951 - 30 April 1952 Korean War The 452d Bomb Wing was a composite combat reserve wing stationed at Long Beach California called to serve in the Korean War. It was composed of men from both the 452d and the 448th Bomb Wings many of whom had served during World War II. With aircrew flying in re-conditioned Douglas B-26 Invader light bombers and ground crew maintaining them in combat readiness, the Wing was cited two times during the Korean War for its intrepid action under difficult circumstances. The unit was called to active duty 10 August 1950 and released from active duty in May 1952. During its period of active duty, it flew over 15,000 combat sorties, at a high cost of personnel and aircraft. 85 men and 39 aircraft never returned.

Marine Corps

Unit Service Year awarded Campaign or battle Other notes
1st Provisional Marine Brigade US Marine Corps 7 August-7 September 1950 Korean War
1st Marine Division US Marine Corps 15 September-11 October 1950 Battle of Inchon, Korean War
1st Marine Division US Marine Corps 27 November-11 December 1950 Battle of Chosin Reservoir, Korean War
1st Marine Division US Marine Corps 21–26 April, 16 May- 30 June and 11–25 September 1951 all one award Korean War
VMO 6 US Marine Corps 2 August 1950- 27 July 1953 Korean War
VMF 214 and VMF 323 US Marine Corps 3–6 August, 8–14 September, 12 October-26 November 1950 and 15 December 50-1 August 1951 all one award Korean War
1st Marine Aircraft Wing US Marine Corps 18 March-30 June, 3 August-29 September 1951 all one award Korean War

Army

Unit Service Year awarded Campaign or battle Other notes
Co A, 5th Infantry & Secti 1, Machinegun Plt, Co D, 5th Infantry U.S. Army 1953 Songnae-dong Army citation
1st Battalion, 43rd Air Defense Art. U.S. Army Nam River Army citation
1st Battalion, 43rd Air Defense Art. U.S. Army Pakchon Army citation
1st Battalion, 43rd Air Defense Art. U.S. Army Wonju-Hwachon
2nd Infantry Division U.S. Army 1951 Korean War
1st Battalion, 7th Infantry U.S. Army 1951 CHOKSONG September 1951 Department of the Army General Order No 79 - DISTINGUISHED UNIT CITATION. - The 1st Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, and the following attached units: Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon, Headquarters and Headquarters Company,7th Infantry Regiment, 1st Platoon, Medical Company, 7th Infantry Regiment; 3d Platoon, Heavy Tank Company, 7th Infantry Regiment;1st Platoon, Heavy Mortar Company, 7th Infantry Regiment, are cited for outstanding performance of duty and extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy near Choksong, Korea, during the period 23 to 25 April 1951. On the morning of. 23 April, the 1st Battalion was given the mission of cleaning out enemy pockets in the rear and on the right and left flanks of the 29th British Independent Brigade. After fighting fiercely the entire day, the battalion was ordered to attack an enemy force estimated to be composed of two regiments which had forced the withdrawal of friendly troops resulting in the entrapment of the Belgian United Nations Battalion. Under Intense enemy small-arms, automatic-weapons, mortar, and artillery fire, the battalion launched a night attack which was pressed with such aggressiveness, determination, and skill that the enemy was required to commit his entire force to meet the onslaught, thereby relieving pressure on the Belgian Battalion and allowing them to withdraw all equipment and vehicles. Following the withdrawal of the Belgian Battalion, and although surrounded on three sides by enemy troops, the 1st Battalion immediately started a brilliantly executed disengagement. The 1st Battalion inflicted such staggering losses on the enemy that he was unable to continue action in that area. On the afternoon of 24 April, the battalion, after a movement of some 15 miles, took up positions of the 7th Infantry Regiment's main line of resistance with the mission of holding a sector of this line. During the night of 24–25 April, the enemy hurled the might of two whole divisions against the 7th Infantry Regiment's front. Although the enemy had succeeded In infiltrating to the rear of the battalion and its right Bank was completely exposed, the 1st Battalion and attached units fought with magnificent tenacity and courage, holding in line until all other units of the 3d Infantry Division had withdrawn. When ordered, the battalion withdrew under a series of enemy attacks. This gallant unit killed over 3,000 enemy troops and wounded an estimated 5,500 of the enemy. The 1st Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, and attached units displayed such gallantry, determination, skill, and espirit de corps in accomplishing their mission under extremely difficult and hazardous conditions as to set them apart and above other units participating In the action, and reflect great credit on each courageous soldier thereof and the military service of. the United States. (General Orders 560, Headquarters, Eighth United States Army, Korea, 19 July 1951.)
2d Battalion, 7th Infantry & 2d Battalion, 15th Infantry U.S. Army 1952 KOWANG-NI July 1952 Department of the Army General Order No 71 DISTINGUISHED UNIT CITATION - The 2d Battalion, 7th Infantry, and the 2nd Battalion, 15th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, and the following attached units: 1st Platoon, Tank Company, 7th Infantry; 3d Platoon, Tank Company, 7th Infantry; 2d Platoon, Heavy Mortar Company, 7th Infantry; Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon, 7th Infantry; Battle Patrol, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 7th Infantry; Counterfire Platoon, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 7th Infantry; 2d Medical Platoon, Medical Company, 7th Infantry; 2d Littler Section, Medical Company, 7th Infantry; 2d Ambulance Section, Medical Company, 7th Infantry; 2d Wire Team, Communications Platoon, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 15th Infantry; 2d Platoon, Heavy Mortar Company, 15th Infantry; Antitank Mine Platoon, 15th Infantry; Liaison Section 2, Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 10th Field Artillery Battalion; Forward Observation Teams 35, 36, and 37, Battery B, 10th Field Artillery Battalion; Liaison Section 2, Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 39th Field Artillery Battalion; Forward Observation Teams 35, 36, and 37, Battery B, 39th Field Artillery Battalion; are cited for outstanding performance of duty and extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Kowang-ni, Korea, during the period 23 to 25 November 1951. On 23 November, the 2d Battalion, 7th Infantry, moved into defensive positions on a hill which was of vital importance to the ceasefire talks then in progress. Soon after assuming responsibility for this sector, the battalion was subjected to a heavy barrage of mortar and artillery fire as a prelude to a full-scale enemy attack. Shortly thereafter, an estimated two regiments of the enemy were observed moving frantically through their own supporting fire in an assault against the friendly positions. Wave after wave of the hostile troops came charging up the slope, only to be beaten back by the heavy fire poured into their ranks by the friendly force. The enemy, determined to take their objective at all costs, concentrated five battalions at one sector of the defense line and, under this tremendous pressure, one of the friendly companies was forced to execute a limited withdrawal to save itself from total annihilation, Although masses of the enemy were hurling themselves at the entire friendly line, the defenders, fighting fiercely against heavy odds, held them back except for this single penetration, The 2d Battalion, 15th Infantry, was immediately ordered to move forward and block the hostile troops attempting to push through the gap in the defense line. Upon reaching the area, one company immediately launched a spirited counterattack. Despite the heavy fire pouring down on them from all sides, the friendly troops pushed the enemy back steadily until the heavy casualties inflicted on them by the numerically superior hostile force made it necessary for them to halt their advance and occupy defensive positions on a newly won ridge. Another friendly company quickly moved through these positions and continued the attack until the enemy was repulsed and the breach in the friendly defense was closed. At this point, a fresh assault company advanced through the other two, who were in the process of consolidating their positions, and drove the enemy completely from the area with heavy casualties. The hostile force immediately launched a fierce counterattack but the friendly troops, exhibiting a matchless fighting spirit, repulsed the enemy repeatedly. Finally, seriously weakened by the tremendous casualties they had suffered, the hostile troops retreated, completely frustrated in their attempt to force the friendly troops from the strategic hill. In this action, approximately 2,000 of the enemy were killed, approximately 8,000 wounded, and 8 taken prisoner. The 2d Battalion, 7th Infantry, and the 2d Battalion,15th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division, and attached units displayed such superlative effectiveness in accomplishing their mission under extremely difficult and hazardous conditions as to set them apart and above other units participating in the action. The extraordinary heroism, singleness of purpose, and esprit de corps exhibited by the members of these units reflect great credit on themselves and are in keeping with the most esteemed traditions of the military service. (General Orders 259. Headquarters, Eighth United States Army. Korea, 21 May 1952)
3rd Battalion, 7th Infantry U.S. Army 1952 SEGOK (Hill 717) March 1952 Department of the Army General Order 33 DISTINGUISHED UNIT CITATION - The 3d Battalion (second award for Company L only), 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, and the following attached units :3d Platoon, Medical Company, 7th Infantry Regiment; 1st Platoon, Heavy Mortar Company, 7th Infantry Regiment (second award) ; 2d Platoon, Heavy Tank Company, 7th Infantry Regiment; 3d Platoon, Heavy Tank Company, 7th Infantry Regiment (second award) ; Liaison Section 244,Headquartcrs Battery, 39th Field Artillery Battalion; Forward Observer Sections 1, 2, and 3, Battery B, 89th Field Artillery Battalion, are cited for outstanding performance of duty and extraordinary heroism inaction against the enemy near Segok, Korea, during the period 30 June to 4 July 1951. On the evening of 30 June, the 3d Battalion and attached units commenced their assigned mission which was to attack and seize Hill 717, the commanding terrain feature of the Chorwon-Kumhwa-Pyonggang area. A previous attempt by a friendly battalion to secure this vital objective had been unsuccessful because of the numerical superiority of the enemy force. Advancing nearly Template:Convert/ydTemplate:Convert/test/A over rugged and uncertain terrain in darkness, while continually under intense enemy small-arms, automatic-weapons, artillery, and mortar fire, the battalion and attached units moved up the precipitous slopes and pressed the attack with such aggressiveness, determination, and skill that the enemy was forced to abandon carefully prepared entrenchments. Throughout the night of1 July, the hostile force savagely counterattacked, attempting to dislodge the battalion and attached units from their precarious positions on the slopes of Hill 717. On the morning of 2 July, the battalion and attached units resumed their assault against the enemy's fortified hill positions. Even though they had suffered severely from the previous night's engagement, these gallant units, imbued with a steadfast determination, continued to advance against vast numbers of the enemy, inflicting staggering losses on the hostile force. In order to supplement its seriously depleted force, the enemy was forced to commit additional reserves to prevent the seizure of this important hill by the friendly forces. The battle continued to rage throughout the night of 2 July, with the enemy force hurling its entire might against the 3d Battalion and attached units, repeatedly charging down on the friendly forces in suicidal waves. In the face of tremendous odds, the valiant members of these units engaged the enemy in hand-to-hand combat with such magnificent tenacity and courage that their positions remained intact and the enemy was repulsed with heavy casualties. The fierce battle went on until, late in the afternoon of 3 July, the stubbornly resisting hostile force was routed from its strongly defended hilltop emplacements. After repulsing several enemy counterattacks during the night, the positions of the friendly units were consolidated on 4 July. Throughout this heroic engagement, more than 1,500 casualties were inflicted on the hostile troops. The 3d Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, and attached units displayed such gallantry, determination, and esprit de corps in accomplishing their mission under extremely difficult and hazardous conditions as to set them apart and above other units participating in the action. The extraordinary heroism displayed by all members of these units reflects great credit on them selves and upholds the highest traditions of the military service. (General Orders 769, Headquarters, Eighth United States Army, Korea, 15 October 1951.)
"A" Company, 72nd Heavy Tank Battalion U.S. Army 22 April to 25 April 1951 Kapyong

United Nations Forces

Unit Service Year awarded Campaign or battle Other notes
3rd Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment Australian Army 22 April to 25 April 1951 Kapyong Only 3rd Battalion permitted to carry DUC streamer on Regimental Colour
2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry Regiment Canadian Army 22 April to 25 April 1951 Kapyong Only 2nd Battalion permitted to carry DUC streamer on Regimental Colour
1st Battalion, Gloucestershire Regiment British Army 23rd, 24th, and 25 April 1951 Battle of the Imjin River
Belgian United Nations Command Battalion Belgian Army 23rd, 24th, and 25 April 1951 Battle of the Imjin River Known as the EXPEDITIONARY CORPS OF BELGIAN AND LUXEMBOURG VOLUNTEERS FOR KOREA. Belgium’s Korea Volunteer Corps (Corps Volontaires Corea) comprised 900 Infantry troops. The 1st Belgium Battalion (1eme Bataillon Belge) arrived in December 1950 and was attached to the U.S. 3rd Infantry Division in January 1951. It was replaced by the 2nd Belgium Battalion (2eme Bataillon Belge) in August 1951, which remained in Korea until June 1955. A 44-man all volunteer infantry platoon from Grand Duchy of Luxembourg served with the Belgium troops until 1953.
Troop C. 170th Independent Mortar Battery, Royal Artillery British Army 23rd, 24th, and 25 April 1951 Battle of the Imjin River Traditions upheld by 25/170 (Imjin) Battery, 47th Regiment Royal Artillery
Nederlands Detachement Verenigde Naties (Netherlands Detachment United Nations) Royal Netherlands Army February 1951 and May–June 1951 Wonju and Hoengson & the Soyang River Battle Designated a battalion of a newly formed regiment, known as the Regiment Van Heutsz.
2 Squadron SAAF South African Air Force November 1950 to December 1953 Korean War During the war the squadron flew a total of 12,067 sorties, most being dangerous ground attack missions, accounting for the loss of 34 pilots and 2 other ranks. 74 of the 94 P-51 Mustangs and 4 out of the 22 F-86 Sabres were lost.
Turkish Armed Forces Command (TAFC) Turkish Army 25–26 January 1951 Battle of Kumyangjang-Ni The Turkish Brigade, a member of the United Nations Forces in Korea was cited for exceptionally outstanding performance of duty in combat in the area of Kumyangjang-ni, Korea, from 25 to 27 January 1951.
Greek Expeditionary Force battalion (Royal Hellenic Battalion) Hellenic Army February 1952 and 17–18 June 1953 The capture of Scotch Hill & the defense of Outpost Harry Known as the Sparta Battalion. 840 soldiers of the Royal Hellenic Battalion arrived in Korea on 9 December 1950. The battalion was assigned to the U.S. 1st Cavalry Division’s 7th Cavalry Regiment. Augmented by a second battalion shortly after the Korean War Armistice Agreement, these units returned home in December 1955.
Greek Expeditionary Force Flight 13 Hellenic Air Force December 1950 Evacuation of US Marines at Hagaru-ri
Bataillon français de l'ONU (French Battalion of the United Nations Organization) French Army February 20, July 11 and August 9, 1951 Actions in Chipyong-Ni 39 officers, 172 non-commissioned officers and more than 800 enlisted personnel arrived at Pusan on 30 November. Equipped with US weapons and vehicles, it was attached to the 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd US Division with which it served until the end of hostilities. 3,421 French soldiers were served in Korea, of which 287 were KIA, 1,350 WIA, 7 MIA, and 12 POW.

Vietnam War

<tr> <td valign="top">USS Bon Homme Richard (CVA-31) and Carrier Air Wing Twenty One <td valign="top">U.S. Navy</td> <td valign="top">1972</td> <td valign="top">Vietnam War</td> <td valign="top">By virtue of the authority vested in me as President of the United States and as Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces of the United States. I have today awarded THE PRESIDENTIAL UNIT CITATION (NAVY) FOR EXTRAORDINARY HEROISM TO USS BON HOMME RICHARD (CVA-31) and ATTACK CARRIER AIR WING TWENTY-ONE For extraordinary heroism and outstanding performance of duty in Action against enemy forces in Southeast Asia from 26 February to 30 July 1967, in support of United States national policy. During this period of intensive combat operations, BON HOMME RICHARD aircraft carried out numerous day and night strikes against a wide variety of targets in North Vietnam and succeeded in inflicting extensive damage to these targets. BON HOMME RICHARD and her embarked Air Wing continuously overcame determined enemy defenses and hazardous weather conditions to project aggressive, effective naval air power against the enemy. All assigned tasks were accomplished expeditiously and contributed significantly to the combat air effort of the United States in Southeast Asia. The courage, professional competence, and devotion to duty displayed by the officers and men of BON HOMME RICHARD and her embarked Attack Carrier Air Wing TWENTY-ONE reflected great credit upon them selves and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Signed Richard M Nixon </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">USS Midway (CV-41) and Carrier Air Wing Five <td valign="top">U.S. Navy</td> <td valign="top">1973</td> <td valign="top">Vietnam War</td> <td valign="top">The Presidential Unit Citation was awarded to USS Midway and its Carrier Air Wing Five "For extraordinary heroism and outstanding performance of duty in action against enemy forces in Southeast Asia from 30 April 1972 to 9 February 1973. During this crucial period of the Vietnam conflict, USS MIDWAY and embarked Attack CarrierAirWing FIVE carried out devastating aerial attacks against enemy installations, transportation, and lines of communications in the face of extremely heavy opposition including multi-calibre antiaircraft artillery fire and surface-to-air missiles. Displaying superb airmanship and unwavering courage, MIDWAY/CVW-5 pilots played a significant role in lifting the prolonged sieges at An Loc, Kontum, and Quang Tri and in carrying out the concentrated aerial strikes against the enemy's industrial heartland which eventually resulted in a cease -fire."</td> </tr>
Unit Service Year awarded Campaign or battle Other notes
366th Tactical Fighter Wing U.S. Air Force Vietnam Cease-Fire The 366th Tactical Fighter Wing, Pacific Air Forces distinguished itself by extroadinary heroism in connection with military operations against opposing armed forces in Southeast Asia, from 1 April 1972 to 26 June 1972. During this period, members of the 366th Tactical Fighter Wing, participating in a variety of tactical missions, were responsible for inflicting heavy damage on hostile forces while flying 11,500 sorties in support of United States and Republic of Vietnam forces under attack. In the course of these operations, Wing personnel repeatedly braveed intense hostile fire from rockets, mortars, antiaircraft artillery-small arms weapons and surface-to-air missiles. The professionalism, dedication to duty, and extraordinary heroism demonstrated by the members of the 366th Tactical Fighter Wing are in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service and reflect the highest credit upon themselves and the Armed Forces of the United States.
Company D 4th Battalion 12th Infantry, 199th Infantry Brigade and Attached Units: Medical Aid Detachment, Battalion Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 4th Battalion 12th Infantry; Forward Observer Team/Battery C, 2nd Battalion 40th Artillery and 1st Platoon, D Troop, 17th Armored Cavalry. U.S. Army 1969 May Offensive GENERAL ORDERS NO. 60 HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY WASHINGTON, DC, 17 OCTOBER 1969: (awarded to these units) who distinguished themselves by extraordinary heroism during the period 5 to 10 May 1968, while engaged in military operations against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Serving as a blocking element to deny hostile forces approach routes into Saigon and portions of Binh Chanh District, Company D and attached units repeatedly displayed outstanding acts of valor against superior forces in offensive, defensive, and ambush operations. During the period nine major contacts were made with elements of four North Vietnamese Army battalions and in each instance the enemy forces were routed from the battlefield by the aggressive action, teamwork, firepower, spirit, heroism, and outstanding tactics of the combined arms team. Maintaining pressure on the enemy forces to prevent their withdrawal, Company D dispersed and demoralized the units and prevented their reorganization, while killing 181 North Vietnamese Army soldiers and capturing ten prisoners of war, numerous weapons, equipment, and ammunition. Throughout the prolonged period of savage fighting the men of Company D by their relentless determination, undaunted courage and aggressive spirit performed countless acts of heroism as they defeated enemy forces with numerically superior automatic weapons, small arms, mortar and rocket fire. These actions significantly contributed to the overall defense of Saigon. The extraordinary heroism, devotion to duty, and determination of all personnel of Company D and attached units reflect great credit upon themselves, their units and the United States Army. Delta Company is also entitled to the Presidential Unit Citation (Army) Streamer embroidered SAIGON
4th Infantry Division U.S. Army 1966 Battle of Ducco and Jackson Hole Vietnam 1st Brigade only and Supporting Units, and second one, Oakleaf Cluster in October and into November 1967, Battle of Dakto the forward 4th Infantry Base Camp and SOG's, Special Forces Camp, and Battle of Kontum,and LZ Jackson Hole, Vietnam.
101st Airborne Division U.S. Army Battle of Dak To 1st Brigade only
101st Airborne Division U.S. Army Battle of Dong Ap Bia Mountain 3rd Brigade Only
11th Armored Cavalry Regiment U.S. Army Hau Nghia-Binh Duong Tet Offensive near Saigon, Hq. Troop (1st Sqdn.), Troops A,B,C and Company D only
VO-67 U.S. Navy 2007 Vietnam War For extraordinary heroism and outstanding performance of duty in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Vietnam from 15 November 1967 to 2 July 1968. Throughout this period, Observation Squadron SIXTY-SEVEN (VO-67), operating in the Republic of Vietnam, successfully executed its primary mission of providing quick reaction, close air support, and combat logistics support for United States and Vietnamese military forces. In the face of extremely harsh climatic conditions at a remote operating base, while sustaining extensive operating damage and losses, the flight crews and ground support personnel of VO-67 carried out their highly important and extremely sensitive missions with outstanding skill and dedication. The Squadron flew countless missions implanting newly developed sensors to detect enemy movement. The support provided by VO-67 was instrumental in supplying real-time intelligence regarding the movement of North Vietnamese troops and supplies, which enabled U.S. Forces to prevent the total invasion of the U.S. Marine Combat Base at Khe Sanh during the Tet Offensive and contributed to saving countless lives. The squadron's operations were consistently characterized by prudent tactics while maintaining meticulous adherence to the rules of engagement, ensuring maximum deterrence of the enemy with minimum risk to friendly troops and civilians. VO-67' s successful initiation of this new mission provided a significant and vital contribution to the art of warfare. By their outstanding courage, resourcefulness, and aggressive fighting spirit in combat against a frequently well-equipped, well-trained, and often numerically superior enemy, the officers and enlisted personnel of Observation Squadron SIXTY-SEVEN reflected great credit upon themselves and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) U.S. Navy 1969 Vietnam War 9 January 1969: The Presidential Unit Citation, covering 23 December 1967–1 June 1968, was awarded to the U.S.S. Kitty Hawk and Carrier Air Wing Eleven (CVW-11) for their exceptional performance during the fierce fighting of the enemy’s Tet Offensive, in part noting that they “succeeded in inflicting extensive damage and destruction to sites and installations vital to the enemy’s operations.” ADM Hyland noted during the award ceremony: “The ship is recognized in professional circles as having been on Yankee Station during the toughest part of the war and against the most heavily defended area in the world.” Kitty Hawk launched 185 major strikes, 150 of them against northern North Vietnam, hitting the Hanoi and Haiphong areas 65 times. Due to fluid enemy tactics additional emphasis was placed upon “lucrative targets of a fleeting nature.”
MACV U.S. Army 1971 Tet Offensive Only Advisor/Liaison Personnel attached to the 3d Armored Cavalry Squadron, Army of the Republic of Vietnam from 1 January 1968 to 30 September 1968. (DAGO 1971-24)[17]
MACV-SOG U.S. Army 2001 Vietnam War Special Forces Top Secret status required decades to declassify (Studies and Observations Group)
1st Battalion, 5th Infantry, Army U.S. Army 1969 Ben Cui 18 August 1968 to 20 September 1968
9th Marines U.S. Marine Corps Operation Dewey Canyon 2 January 1969 to 18 March 1969 Army PUC
26th Marines U.S. Marine Corps 20 January to 1 April 1968
1st Mobile Communications Group U.S. Air Force 1969 Vietnam War 1 January 1967 to 15 February 1968
D Company, 6th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment Australian Army 1968 Battle of Long Tan 18 August 1966 - 19 August 1966
17 SOS U.S. Air Force 1969 Vietnam War 1–30 June 1969 Combat in Southeast Asia, 1 June 1969–30 September 1971.[18]
834th Air Division U.S. Air Force 1969 Battle for Khe Sahn 483rd Tactical Airlift Wing, 535th Tactical Airlift Squadron (C-7A Caribou) received the Navy Presidential Unit Citation and the Air Force Presidential Unit Citation for airlift support of Khe Sanh and other forward bases from January to May 1968.
834th Air Division U.S. Air Force 1971 Battle for Dak Seang 483rd Tactical Airlift Wing, 535th Tactical Airlift Squadron (C-7A Caribou) received the Air Force Presidential Unit Citation, Special Order GB-613 dated 3 September 1971, for extraordinary gallantry from 1 April 1970 to 30 June 1970 for participation in aerial resupply of the besieged Special Forces Camp at Deak Seang. Nearly all C-7A Caribou's sustained battle damage during this time. Six, 6, C-7A Caribou's and fifteen, 15, airmen were lost during this time due to extreme enemy fire. This amounts to almost one-half of C-7A Caribou losses since the U.S. Air Force took over the C-7A Caribou mission from the U.S. Army in 1967. The primary mission for C-7A Caribou's was to support Special Forces and Special Operations Group missions and bases located throughout South Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos.
3rd Marine Division U.S. Marine Corps 8 March 65-15 September 67 Vietnam
1st Marine Division U.S. Marine Corps 29 March 65-15 September 67 Vietnam
1st Marine Aircraft Wing U.S. Marine Corps 11 May 65-15 September 67 Vietnam
5th Marine Regiment U.S. Marine Corps 25 April-5 June 67 Vietnam
1st Marine Regiment U.S. Marine Corps 31 January-2 March 68 Vietnam
1st Marine Division U.S. Marine Corps 16 September 67-31 October 68 Vietnam
Seal Team One US Navy 11 November 1968 Vietnam [19]
1st Marine Regiment U.S. Marine Corps 20 November-31 December 68 Vietnam
CAP Program, III MAF U.S. Marine Corps 1 January-31 December 68 Vietnam
Seal Team Two US Navy 1970 Vietnam [20]
MACV U.S. Marine Corps 24 January 64-30 April 72 Army PUC Vietnam
Operation Sealords Various units 1968–1972 Vietnam
Operation Swift raiders Various units 6 December 1968-31 March 1969 Vietnam
MOBILE RIVERINE FORCE (TASK FORCE 117) U.S. Navy 29 January to 4 March 1968 Vietnam For exceptionally meritorious and heroic service from 29 January to 4 March 1968 while engaged in armed conflict against communist insurgent (Viet Cong) forces in the Republic of Vietnam. Throughout the Tet (Lunar New Year) Offensive, the Mobile Riverine Force (MRF) was locked in nearly continuous combat as the enemy lay siege to or threatened to attack every large population center and military installation in the Delta. During this hectic, 35-day campaign, the MRF played a vital role in driving the enemy out of My Tho and Vinh Long, the most severely ravaged of all the Delta cities, and in preventing enemy forces from launching sustained attacks on Can Tho, Binh Thuy, Sa Dec, Cai Be, Cai Lay, the Army Base at Dong Tam, and many other less-populated areas. In every battle, MRF personnel, both individually and collectively, although often matched against forces of much greater size than their own, displayed outstanding courage and professionalism in subduing the Viet Cong challenge. Navy crewmen embarked in Monitors, Command and Communication Boats, Assault Support Patrol Boats, and Armored Troop Carriers were frequently ambushed at point-blank range from concealed positions along both banks of the narrow, jungle-enshrouded Delta streams. In each instance, they succeeded in suppressing the enemy fire before maneuvering their assault craft out of ambush areas. Together, the MRF Army/Navy team successfully met the challenge posed by the Tet Offensive, probably saving the Delta from being overrun by insurgent forces. The gallantry, professionalism, courage under fire, and devotion to duty displayed by the officers and men of the United States Navy Element of the Mobile Riverine Force were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
COMMANDER TASK GROUP 194.0 (Units Participating in Operation SEA LORDS) U.S. Navy 18 October to 5 December 1968 Vietnam For extraordinary heroism and outstanding performance of duty from 18 October to 5 December 1968 while engaged in armed conflict against enemy forces in the Republic of Vietnam. Commander Task Group 194.0 initiated and prosecuted the first of several interdiction campaigns to sever enemy lines of communication and resupply and to establish the legal government in areas previously held by the enemy. The naval units engaged in Operation SEA LORDS consistently displayed the striking power and professionalism which were to mark this and following campaigns. Tasked with routing a myriad of enemy forces from their previous sanctuaries, personnel of Commander Task Group 194.0 ventured courageously into little-known canals and back-water areas, fighting valiantly through countless intense enemy rocket and automatic weapons attacks. The naval units, through their persistent and aggressive strikes against enemy strongholds, were eminently successful in their campaign to interdict enemy resupply routes and base areas throughout the lower Mekong Delta region. The courage, professionalism, and dedication displayed by the officers and men of Commander Task Group 194.0 reflected credit upon themselves and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
COMMANDER TASK GROUP 194.9 (Units Participating in Operation GIANT SLINGSHOT) U.S. Navy 6 December 1968 to 31 March 1969 Vietnam For extraordinary heroism and outstanding performance of duty from 6 December 1968 to 31 March 1969 while engaged in armed conflict against enemy forces in the Republic of Vietnam. Commander Task Group 194.9 initiated and prosecuted a determined interdiction offensive against the ingress of enemy personnel and war material from Southeast Cambodia into the upper Mekong Delta region of the Republic of Vietnam. The naval units engaged in Operation GIANT SLINGSHOT, including the Riverine Warfare and River Patrol Forces who supplied support, consistently distinguished themselves by their countless deeds of valiant service while carrying out patrols along the narrow, enemy-infested Vam Co, Vam Co Dong, and Vam Co Tay Rivers. Operating with limited logistic support under austere and dangerous conditions, personnel of Commander Task Group 194.9 countered intense rocket and automatic weapons barrages at point-blank range with unshakable determination. As a result of their intrepidity and resolution, the enemy threat was significantly diminished and vital routes of resupply were severed. The quantity of captured enemy war material reached staggering proportions, and the ever-increasing number of enemy casualties attested to the effectiveness of ingeniously developed individual and group offensive tactics. The selfless dedication and inspiring professional performance of the officers and men of Commander Task Group 194.9 reflected credit upon themselves and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
MOBILE RIVERINE FORCE (TASK FORCE 117) U.S. Navy 25 January through 5 July 1969 Vietnam For extraordinary heroism and outstanding performance of duty from 25 January through 5 July 1969 while engaged in armed conflict against enemy forces in the Mekong Delta region of the Republic of Vietnam. With enemy forces planning to launch a large-scale, winter-spring offensive against Saigon and other cities of the upper Mekong Delta, the ships and assault craft of Task Force 117 provided waterborne mobile support to United States Army, Vietnamese Army, and Vietnamese Marine Corps troops. By riverine assault operations preempting enemy offensive operations, the Force made a significant contribution to thwarting the threat to Saigon and the Mekong Delta. Surprise attacks and routine fire fights on the narrow streams and canals were an almost daily occurrence, while rocket and mining attacks against the Mobile Riverine Bases were an ever present danger. The courage and determination of Task Force 117 personnel contributed significantly to the successful completion of each Force objective. The skill, fortitude, perseverance, and sustained outstanding performance of the officers and men of the United States Navy Element of the Mobile Riverine Force reflected great credit upon themselves and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
RUNG SAT SPECIAL ZONE RIVER PATROL GROUP U.S. Navy 24 June 1969 to 28 February 1970 Vietnam For extraordinary heroism and outstanding performance of duty in action against an armed enemy in the Republic of Vietnam from 24 June 1969 to 28 February 1970. During this period, the Rung Sat Special Zone River Patrol Group operated throughout the 405-square-mile maze of rivers, canals, waterways and mangrove swamps of the Rung Sat Special Zone and on the upper Saigon River. When enemy sappers mounted an aggressive offensive against free-world merchant shipping in late spring of 1969, the Rung Sat Special Zone River Patrol Group, in conjunction with South Vietnamese forces, commenced a unique, unrelenting campaign of combined counter-offensive operations. Over two-hundred successful combined operations with United States Army, Air Force and South Vietnamese ground, air and waterborne units were conducted, which routed the enemy from his sanctuaries, denied him access to his source of food, restricted his freedom of movement, and established security for the safe passage of 4,800 free-world merchant ships on the vital Long Tau shipping channel to Saigon. Concurrent with operations in the Rung Sat Special Zone, the task group demonstrated great flexibility and response by initiating counter-offensive operations against threatening enemy forces on the upper Saigon River. Despite extremely limited support facilities, incessant heat, and torrential monsoon rains, units of the task force fought a series of savage battles, repeatedly distinguishing themselves, and inflicted great losses on the enemy, denying him further use of a major infiltration route threatening the city of Saigon. The outstanding courage, resourcefulness, and perseverance displayed by the officers and men of the Rung Sat Special Zone River Patrol Group were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
2D Brigade, 9th Infantry Division, United States Army, composed of: Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Brigade 3d Battalion, 47th Infantry, 3d Battalion, 60th Infantry, Company C, 4th Battalion, 47th Infantry, 3d Battalion, 34th Artillery U.S. Army 29 January to 4 March 1968 Vietnam The foregoing assigned units of the 2d Brigade, 9th Infantry Division, United States Army component of the Mobile Riverine Force, distinguished themselves by displaying extraordinary heroism in action against an armed hostile force during the Tet Offensive and immediately thereafter from 29 January to 4 March 1968 in the Mekong Delta, Republic of Vietnam. Although the enemy possessed many tactical advantages due to an intimate knowledge of the area and detailed long range planning, his offensive was shattered within 5 weeks of its inception. In the Provincial capital of My Tho, 2d Brigade soldiers fought in a crowded city, an unfamiliar environment for infantry who were trained to fight primarily in a riverine environment. After restoring the security of the western sector of the city, the riverine forces commenced successive operations against enemy movements. At Cai Lai, they disrupted enemy attempts at regrouping. Strikes in and around Vinh Long and My Tho collapsed maturing enemy offensives which threatened these two key cities. Finally the riverine forces moved to the relief of the city of Can Tho, where, in 3 weeks of virtually continuous combat, the heaviest enemy attack of the entire Delta offensive was broken. The 2d Brigade engaged the enemy wherever he could be found and inflicted heavy casualties. The achievements of the riverine forces in turning back the enemy offensive represent a key factor in the operations that saved the Delta. The aggressiveness, determination, and exemplary courage under fire demonstrated by all members of the United States Army component are in the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon the 2d Brigade, 9th Infantry Division, the Mobile Riverine Force, and the United States Army.
1st Brigade, 9th Infantry Division, composed of: Headquarter and Headquarters Company 2nd Battalion, 39th Infantry-2nd Battalion 60th Infantry, and Attached Units: Company A, 15th Engineer Battalion-1st Battalion, 11th Artillery U.S. Army 7 March 1968 to 22 June 1968 Vietnam The 1st Brigade, 9th Infantry Division, and attached units distinguished themselves by extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against hostile forces in the Republic of Vietnam during the period 7 March 1968 to 22 June 1968. The 1st Brigade, 9th Infantry Division with attached units reopened and secured Highway 4, the vital link between the Mekong Delta and Saigon, in Dinh Tuong Province and conducted operations against main-force units operating in the area adjacent to Highway 4. In a series of operations, the 1st Brigade, with Company A, 15th Engineer Battalion (Attached) and the 1st Battalion, 11th Artillery in direct support, located and engaged superior enemy forces in some of the most difficult terrain in Vietnam. The swift, decisive and fierce actions of the maneuver and supporting elements annihilated three well equipped and well trained enemy battalions. The 1st Brigade succeeded in driving the Viet Cong from their traditional base areas in central Dinh Tuong Province. During these actions, 629 Viet Cong were killed and 144 captured along with 184 individual and crew served weapons captured and destroyed. The 1st Brigade's success in reopening Highway 4 restored use of this vital communications link to the Vietnamese populace. By their determined display of initiative, professional skill and extraordinary courage, which was in the highest traditions of the military service, the men of the 1st Brigade, 9th Infantry Division and attached units reflected the utmost credit upon themselves, the 9th Infantry Division and the United States Army.

Operation Iraqi Freedom

Unit Service Year awarded Campaign or battle Other notes
1st Armored Division U.S. Army 2004 Operation Iraqi Freedom Army Citation
3rd Infantry Division U.S. Army 2003 Operation Iraqi Freedom The 3d Infantry Division and is supporting units distinguished themselves by extraordinary gallantry, valor, professionalism and esprit de corps displayed in the conduct of usually complex, difficult, and hazardous combat operation to liberate Iraq from 19 March 2003 to 1 May 2003.

Relentlessly attacking over unforgiving terrain during extremely difficult weather conditions, the division advanced 750 kilometers while spearheading the Coalition’s offensive.

Continuously opposed by determined Iraqi forces using both conventional and unconventional tactics, under frequent threat of chemical attack, the soldiers of the 3d Infantry Division decisively won every engagement of every battle by virtue of their unequaled fighting spirit, dedication to duty, and commitment to their cause.

Before the fighting ended, the division defeated or destroyed four Republican Guard Divisions, one Iraqi Regular Army Division, three Special Republican Guard Brigades, and thousands of fanatical paramilitary forces; sustaining few casualties, the 3d Infantry Division achieved one of the most stunning victories in military history.

Aggressively attacking into the heart of Baghdad the division ultimately removed the brutal Iraqi regime from power, then rapidly transitioned to enforce law and order and help rebuild a shattered nation despite the constant threat of terrorist attacks. Its efforts have been instrumental in the success of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

The courage, skill, and professionalism of the division’s soldiers and its supporting units exemplify the highest traditions of military service and are in keeping with the finest tradition of the 3d Infantry Division “Rock of the Marne” and the United States Army.

I Marine Expeditionary Force U.S. Marine Corps 21Mar-24Apr2003 Operation Iraqi Freedom For extraordinary heroism and outstanding performance in action against enemy forces in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom from 21 March to 24 April 2003. During this period, I Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF) (REIN) conducted the longest sequence of coordinated combined arms overland attacks in the history of the Marine Corps. From the border between Kuwait and Iraq, to the culmination of hostilities north of Baghdad, I MEF advanced nearly 800 kilometers under sustained and heavy combat. Utilizing the devastaing combat power of organic aviation assests, coupled with awesome power resident in the ground combat elements and maintaining momentum through the herculean efforts of combat service support elements, I MEF destroyed nine Iraqi divisions. This awesome display of combat power was accomplished while simultaneously freeing the Iraqi people from more than 30 years of oppression and reestablishing basic infrastructure in the country. During the 33 days of combat, to the transition to civil-military operations, I MEF sustained tempo of operations never before seen on the modern battlefield, conducting four major river crossings, maintaining the initiative, and sustaining forces. The ferocity and duration of the campaign was made possible through the skills and determination of the Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines, and Coalition Partners comprising I MEF at all levels, all echelons, and in all occupational fields. By their devotion to duty, the officers and enlisted personnel of I Marine Expeditionary Force (REIN) reflect great credit upon themselves and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
First Naval Construction Division - 1st Marine Expeditionary Force (I MEF - Engineer Group (I MEG) U.S. Navy 2003 Operation Iraqi Freedom Navy Citation, for 31 March to 24 April 2003 [3]
NSW Task Group-Central, NSW Squadron 3, and NSW Unit 3 U.S. Navy 2006 Operation Iraqi Freedom Navy Citation [4]
814th Bridge Company - Attached to 3rd ID U.S. Army 2003 Operation Iraqi Freedom Army Citation
478th Combat Engineer Battalion - Attached to 1st MEF(1st MEG) U.S. Army 2003 Operation Iraqi Freedom Army Confirmed Navy Citation

[5] [6]

Cold War

Unit Service Year awarded Campaign or battle Other notes
USS Parche (SSN-683) US Navy 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1986, 1993, 1994, 1998,[21] 2004 Operation Ivy Bells, Operation Manta/Acetone The most decorated unit in U.S. Navy history, with a total of nine PUCs awarded during its 30 years of service.[22] Parche's special modifications and extensive research and development duties allowed her to be the premier spy submarine in the US fleet. This earned her the many PUCs, but prevents the release of many of the details involved. [7]
USS Richard B. Russell (SSN-687) US Navy 1987[21] Operation Manta/Acetone Submarine communications cable-taping operations while USS Parche underwent hull overhaul
USS Halibut (SSN-587) US Navy 1972 Operation Ivy Bells Navy Citation. [8][9]
USS Flasher (SSN-613) US Navy 1970 Awarded PUC for having tailed on a Soviet Navy Hotel II ballistic missile submarine undetected for more than twenty days - first long tailing in the Pacific.
USS Lapon (SSN-661) US Navy 1969 Awarded PUC for having tailed on a Soviet Navy Yankee class ballistic missile submarine undetected for a period of forty-seven days.
USS Halibut (SSN-587) US Navy 1968 Operation Sand Dollar Navy Citation for search mission to locate the sunken Soviet ballistic missile submarine K-129 (Project Jennifer). [10]
USS Triton (SSRN-586) US Navy 1960 Operation Sandblast Navy Citation for the first submerged circumnavigation made during its shakedown cruise, for 16 February 1960 to 10 May 1960; second peacetime PUC awarded to a unit of the U.S. Navy.[11]
USS Nautilus (SSN-571) US Navy 1958 Operation Sunshine Navy Citation for the first submerged voyage under the North Pole, for 22 July 1958 to 5 August 1958; first peacetime PUC awarded to a unit of the U.S. Navy.[12]

Other actions

Unit Service Year awarded Campaign or battle Other notes
US Coast Guard US Coast Guard 2006 Hurricane Katrina Entire Coast Guard (including auxiliary and civilians) no Navy or Marine Corps personnel included
US Navy SEAL Team 6 US Navy 2011 Operation Neptune's Spear [23]

Non-U.S. recipients

World War II

Two units of the Free French Forces were awarded Presidential Unit Citations during World War II. The first was the 2nd Armored Division, which received the award after the liberation of Strasbourg; the second was the 3rd Foreign Infantry Regiment, which received it in 1946 with the inscription 'Rhine-Bavarian Alps'.

On April 22, 1986, the 1st Fighter Group Força Aérea Brasileira (the Brazilian Air Force) was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation for its actions in the Po Valley region of Italy in World War II. The Brazilians, operating in Italy in support of Allied forces, destroyed in one day (April 22, 1945) over 45 vehicles, strafed pontoon bridges on the River Po (hampering a German retreat) and harassed fixed positions of the German forces. From the citation:

"The casualties that they suffered reduced their pilot strength to about one half that of the United States Army Air Force squadrons operating in the same area, but they flew an equal number of sorties as their US counterparts...Eleven missions of 44 sorties were flown destroying nine motor transports and damaging 17. Additionally, they destroyed the facilities of a motor pool, immobilized 35 horse vehicles, damaged a road bridge and a pontoon bridge, destroyed 14 and damaged three enemy-occupied buildings, and attacked four military positions and inflicted much other damage."Template:Citation needed

Korean War

The 1st Battalion, Gloucestershire Regiment and Troop C, 170th Independent Mortar Battery of the British Army were both awarded the Presidential Unit Citation for their defence of a hill whilst surrounded during the Battle of the Imjin River. The 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry and 3rd Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment were awarded the citation for their actions during the Battle of Kapyong, shortly afterwards.

One Belgian unit, Belgian-Luxemburgian Battalion (now the 3rd Parachute Regiment,) was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation once for actions during the Battle of the Imjin River.

One Dutch unit, the Netherlands Detachment United Nations, part of the Regiment Van Heutsz, was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation twice for actions during the Korean War. The first citation was awarded after the battle near Wonju and Hoengson in February 1951. The unit was awarded a second time for its bravery during the Soyang River Battle in May–June 1951.

One South African unit, the 2 Squadron SAAF was also awarded this honour, presented in August, 1956.[24]

President Harry Truman signed a Distinguished Unit Citation (now the Presidential Unit Citation) on July 11, 1951, for the Turkish Brigade's acts of heroism. It reads: "The Turkish Brigade, a member of the United Nations Forces in Korea is cited for exceptionally outstanding performance of duty in combat in the area of Kumyangjang-ni, Korea, from 25 to 27 January 1951."

The Greek Expeditionary Force, Sparta Battalion, was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation for their actions in the defense of Outpost Harry while vastly outnumbered by Chinese forces, June 18, 1953.

The French battalion of the UN forces in Korea, attached to the 23rd Infantry Regiment, US 2nd Infantry Division ("Indian Head"), received 3 Distinguished Unit Citations in 1951 : on February 20, July 11 (actions in Chipyong-Ni) and August 9 (as part of the 2nd Infantry Division).

Vietnam War

A Presidential Unit Citation was awarded to D Company, 6th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment, on 28 May 1968, for the unit's actions at Long Tan, South Vietnam.

In 1977, the Presidential Unit Citation was presented to New Zealand's 161 Battery in 1977 for service during the Vietnam War in 1965-66.[25][26]

In 1971, the Presidential Unit Citation was awarded to the 3d Armored Cavalry Squadron, Army of the Republic of Vietnam and attached U.S. Advisor/Liaison Personnel for extraordinary heroism during the period 1 January 1968 to 30 September 1968 in actions in Pleiku and Binh Dinh Provinces. (DA General Order No. 24, 27 April 1971.)[17]

In 1966, the Presidential Unit Citation was awarded to the 514th Tactical Fighter Squadron of the Republic of Vietnam Air Force for extraordinary heroism and outstanding performance of duty in combat against an armed enemy of the Republic of Vietnam throughout the period 1 January 1964 to 28 February 1965.

Operation Enduring Freedom

On December 7, 2004, the Combined Joint Special Operations Task Force-South, known as Task Force K-BAR, a special collection of U.S. and international special forces units, was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation. This award, for service between 17 October 2001 and 30 March 2002, was very unusual in that it was made to multiple international units fighting in the War in Afghanistan.[27]

The following units were recognized:

In the Presidential Unit Citation for Task Force K-BAR, Major General W. Semianiw, Chief Military Personnel For the Chief of the Defense Staff, stated:

Template:Cquote

See also

Notes

  1. "Chapter 7 United States Unit Awards". Army Regulation 600-8-22. Washington, DC: Department of the Army. 2011. p. 80. http://armypubs.army.mil/epubs/pdf/R600_8_22.pdf. Retrieved 2012-01-25. 
  2. "Army Presidential Unit Citations". The Institute of Heraldry, Office of the Administrative Assistant to the Secretary of the Army. http://www.tioh.hqda.pentagon.mil/Awards/army_presidential.aspx. Retrieved 2009-03-02. 
  3. "AMTRAC.ORG - Navy Presidential Unit Citation Page". http://www.amtrac.org/1atbn/Commendations/description/PUC.asp. 
  4. "Citation—Presidential Unit Citation for making the first submerged circumnavigation of the world". http://garrygray.tripod.com/presidential_unit_citation.htm. 
  5. War Department General Orders Number 44, 6 June 1945
  6. Blakeley, Herbert W., Major General, Retired (6 May 1943). "The 32d Infantry Division in World War II (General Orders Number 21, War Department)". pp. 130, 131. http://colonel.howe.home.att.net/ozagain.htm. Retrieved 2008-11-14. 
  7. Company "A"
  8. "The 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment". http://www.ww2-airborne.us/units/504/504_citations.html. Retrieved 2009-09-11. 
  9. Sredl, K editor: "Defenders of Liberty", page 213. Turner Publishing Co., 1996
  10. http://www.7thfighter.com/21stfg/index.htm
  11. 11.0 11.1 Davis, Coffin and Woodward, ed (1948). "Introduction". The 56th Fighter Group in World War II. Infantry Journal, Inc.. , xvi.
  12. ">Danny Morris (1972). Aces & Wingmen. Neville Spearman Ltd., London. ISBN 85435 241 4. ,144-148.
  13. Air Force Combat Units of World War II By United States USAF Historical Division, Maurer Maurer, James Gilbert
  14. "Distinguished Unit Citation". United States Air Force. http://483rd.com/memcit.html. Retrieved 2011-11-21. 
  15. Dictionary of American Fighting Ships, Department of the Navy
  16. James Forrestal, Sec of the Navy, for the President. Presidential Unit Citation
  17. 17.0 17.1 "Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for extraordinary heroism". http://www.apd.army.mil/pdffiles/go7124.pdf. Retrieved 2010-06-11. 
  18. "History of the 17th Special Operations Squadron in SEA". http://airwarvietnam.com/17sos.htm. 
  19. "President Cites Seal Team" (ProQuest), New York Times: 21, 12 November 1968 
  20. "Washington For the Record" (ProQuest), New York Times: 4, 19 June 1970 
  21. 21.0 21.1 Sherry Sontag and Christopher Drew, Blind Man's Bluff
  22. Navy News article reprint "USS Parche Dedicates Sail to Museum" by PO2 Maebel Tinoko, August 29, 2007, http://www.military.com/features/0,15240,147559,00.html?ESRC=navy.nl 
  23. Template:Cite news
  24. Template:Cite journal
  25. 161 Bty in Vietnam
  26. "SAS soldiers awarded rare presidential honour". The New Zealand Herald. 24 May 2007. http://www.nzherald.co.nz/category/story.cfm?c_id=359&objectid=10441467. Retrieved 12 September 2011. 
  27. "Enduring Freedom Task Force Earns Presidential Unit Citation". http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=16216. 

References

External links

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